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Washington State University Office of Civil Rights Compliance and Investigation

Annual Security and Fire Report | 2018 Calendar Year

Pullman | 2019-2020

EDUCATION/ AWARENESS/ PREVENTION

 

Table of Contents

1 – To the WSU Community
2 – Support Resources On and Off Campus
3 – Preparation of the Annual Security Report
4 – Reporting Crimes and Other Emergencies
5 – Walking Escort and Transportation Services
6 – About the WSU Police Department
7 – Timely Warnings
8 – Emergency Response and Evacuation Procedures
9 – Security of and Access to WSU Facilities
10 – Sex and Gender Violence Education and Prevention Efforts
11 – Support and Reporting Options for Survivors of Sexual Violence, including Sexual Assault, Sexual Exploitation, Intimate Partner Violence, and Stalking
12 – University Investigative Processes and Procedures for Survivors of Sexual Violence, including Sexual Assault, Sexual Exploitation, Intimate Partner Violence, and Stalking
13 – Definitions of Offenses
14 – Other Policies and Procedures
15 – Drug and Alcohol Policies
16 – Counseling Services and Outreach Education
17 – Campus Security Policies and Safety Awareness Programs
18 – Housing and Fire Safety Report
19 – Residence Hall Fire and Safety Regulations
20 – University Fire Safety Guidelines
21 – Annual Disclosure of Crime Statistics
22 – Definitions Under Washington State Law (RCW 9A.44.010, RCW 26.50.010)
23 – Crimes Under Washington State Law
24 – Reporting Coverage Map
25 – Fire Statistics
26 – Comparative Crime Statistics

 


Section 1 | To the WSU Community

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Kirk Schulz, WSU President

President Kirk Schulz

Ensuring the safety of the entire University community—students, faculty, staff, and visitors across our statewide system—is one of our highest institutional priorities.

How do we support this priority? We have made two major commitments: 1) to regularly update and improve our campus safety plans and 2) to engage the entire Cougar family in participating in safety initiatives.

Dedicated safety personnel on each campus have collaborated to create plans for maintaining a secure, supportive community. They foster a culture that treats each individual with dignity and respect. They build upon resources that deliver care and assistance to each individual with whom they interact.

Simultaneously, we place a premium on educating our community members to take responsibility for their own personal safety. Each of us has an important role to play in creating a safe environment. Our choices can impact those around us.

The University is well-prepared to help you make choices that are thoughtful and informed. Our safety resources are among the most comprehensive offered by any college or university in the nation.

I encourage you to review this report. It provides important details about the safety resources available to you. Working together, WSU’s campuses will continue to be among the safest and most welcoming in the United States.

Go Cougs!

Bill Gardner, WSU Director of Public Safety

It is a pleasure to welcome you to Washington State University. Our Public Safety mission is to maintain a secure environment for students, employees, and campus visitors. This brochure, prepared in compliance with the Jeanne Clery Act of 1990, contains helpful information about a number of safety related issues. We hope that as you become familiar with the contents of this publication you’ll feel comfortable with the safety resources available to you on campus, that you’ll know how to report a crime or suspicious behavior, and that you’ll be prepared to respond successfully to an emergency. While following prescribed safety tips and procedures is important, the best safety is a result of your willingness to help another- “Cougs helping Cougs” describes a longstanding tradition at WSU, and we urge you to be a part of it.

Go Cougs!

Gary Jenkins, Chief of Police, Pullman Police Department

On behalf of the Pullman Police Department, I would like to welcome new and returning Cougs to Pullman! My staff and I are committed to the safety of the Pullman community, and will work tirelessly to prevent crime and personal injury for all who live and learn in the City of Pullman. We work closely with our partners at the WSU Police Department, as well as with WSU faculty, staff, and student organizations, to maintain a safe community environment. I look forward to working with each of you in our continued effort to keep this a great place to live, work, and learn. Best wishes for a rewarding, successful, and safe year!

 


Section 2 | Support Resources On and Off Campus

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Police Resources:

WSU has a working relationship with local law enforcement agencies and can request information from those agencies related to police investigations that impact WSU. Law enforcement agencies may share information with WSU where it is legally permissible to do so.

WSU Police Department (WSU PD) | police.wsu.edu

Pullman Police Department (Pullman PD) | pullman-wa.gov/departments/police

Whitman County Sheriff’s Office | whitmancounty.org/sheriff

IN CASE OF AN EMERGENCY CALL 911

 

University Resources:

These offices share information on a need-to-know basis but cannot guarantee confidentiality. Unless designated as a confidential resource, most WSU employees are required to report incidents of sexual harassment and misconduct to the WSU Title IX Coordinator.

WSU Access Center | accesscenter.wsu.edu

Office of the Dean of Students (DOS) | deanofstudents.wsu.edu

Office of Civil Rights Compliance and Investigation (CRCI) | crci.wsu.edu

Center for Community Standards| communitystandards.wsu.edu; handbook.wsu.edu

Student Financial Services (SFS) | finaid.wsu.edu

Office of the University Ombudsman | ombudsman.wsu.edu

Office of International Programs | ip.wsu.edu

 

Employee Services:

Employee Assistance Program (EAP) | eap.wsu.edu

Human Resource Services (HRS) | hrs.wsu.edu

 

Confidential Resources:

In most instances, service providers from the following resources can speak with students confidentially about their concerns.

WSU Cougar Health Services

Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) | cougarhealth.wsu.edu/counseling

Medical Clinic | cougarhealth.wsu.edu/medical-clinic/services/

 

Off-Campus Confidential Resources:

Palouse River Counseling | palouserivercounseling.org

Alternatives to Violence of the Palouse (ATVP) | atvp.org

Pullman Regional Hospital (PRH) | pullmanregional.org

Northwest Justice Project Free Legal Hotline (CLEAR) | nwjustice.org

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline | 800-273-8255 or 800-273-TALK

 

Transportation Services:

Pullman Transit (bus) | pullman-wa.gov/departments/pullman-transit

Dial-A-Ride | pullman-wa.gov/departments/pullman-transit/dial-a-ride

Cougar Security Walking Escort Service | police.wsu.edu/cougar-security/

Wheatland Express, Eastern Washington bus service | wheatlandexpress.com

 

For resources available on campus and within the community at branch campuses, please visit crci.wsu.edu/resources/

 


Section 3 | Preparation of the Annual Security Report

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Washington State University (WSU) prepares this report in compliance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (Clery Act), as well as the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (VAWA) amendments to the Clery Act, using information obtained by the WSU Clery Compliance Committee comprised of representatives from various WSU offices including, but not limited to, the WSU Police Department (WSU PD), the Office of Civil Rights Compliance and Investigation (CRCI), the Center for Community Standards (CCS), Cougar Health Services (CHS), Housing and Residence Life, and the Office of Emergency Management.

Additionally, information is gathered from Campus Security Authorities, local law enforcement agencies (including the Pullman Police Department (Pullman PD) and the Whitman County Sheriff’s Office), and information provided by other surrounding law enforcement agencies.

The report also includes statistics for the previous three calendar years (2016, 2017, and 2018) concerning reported crimes that occurred on campus, and in certain off-campus buildings or property owned or controlled by WSU. In accordance with the Clery Act, the statistics contained in this report are limited to specific crimes occurring within a designated geographic area. A list of the crimes and definitions can be found in Section 13 (definitions under State Law are also included in Section 22 and Section 23), and a map of the designated geographic area is in Section 24 of this report. The statistics in this report may vary from statistics maintained within other WSU offices authorized to receive reports of incidents implicating laws and WSU policies, such as the WSU Police Department, the Pullman Police Department, the Office of Civil Rights Compliance and Investigation, the Center for Community Standards, and/or Cougar Health Services.

The Clery Act promotes campus safety by providing information to students, parents, employees, and the WSU community about public safety, crime prevention, and response efforts by WSU. It also promotes transparency about crimes that occur on campus and other threats to health and safety. To further those efforts, this report provides information on education, prevention, and awareness efforts by WSU to empower the WSU community to take a more active role in their personal safety and security.

 


Section 4 | Reporting Crimes and Other Emergencies

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WSU encourages accurate and prompt reporting of all crimes to campus public safety officials and the appropriate police agencies, when the victim of a crime elects to, or is unable to, make such a report. Additionally, there are various ways for students, faculty, staff, and WSU community members to report crimes, incidents, and other emergencies to appropriate WSU officials. Individuals can report in progress crimes and other emergencies by dialing 911 or crimes that are not in progress by dialing 509-332-2521. This allows the WSU Police Department to take action to address the concern and consider issuing a Timely Warning or Emergency Notification if there is an ongoing threat to the safety of the campus community or an immediate threat occurring on campus. Section 10 and Section 11 of this report include additional information on specific reporting and services available to victims of sexual violence, including sexual assault, intimate partner violence, or stalking.

Voluntary, Confidential Reporting

WSU provides a number of ways individuals can report crimes, serious incidents, and other emergencies. However, in the event that you or someone you know, decides not to report the incident to the university or law enforcement for investigation you still have the option of filing a voluntary, confidential report.

Reporting anonymously allows WSU to include the record of the report in the annual disclosure of crime statistics included in this report. Reporting anonymously also allows victims to gather information and learn about options available to them, before deciding on an appropriate option. Individuals may contact the relevant local agency (e.g. the WSU Police Department at 509-335-8548, or the Pullman Police Department at 509-334-0802) to determine the level of anonymity available prior to reporting a crime. Please note that some limitations may exist depending upon the circumstances of the crime. Reports of sexual assault may be made anonymously to the WSU Police Department; for more information, visit: https://police.wsu.edu/sexual-assault-investigations/elements-section/. Additionally, individuals may report discrimination, sexual harassment, and sexual misconduct, as defined by the WSU Policy Prohibiting Discrimination, Sexual Harassment, and Sexual Misconduct, Executive Policy 15 (EP 15), anonymously to the WSU Office of Civil Rights Compliance and Investigation in person, via phone (509-335-8288), or via the online complaint form (crci.wsu.edu/file-a-complaint/) for services and options, as well as inclusion in the annual disclosure of crime statistics.

Individuals can also seek confidential services from WSU Counseling and Psychological Services (cougarhealth.wsu.edu/counseling/), or WSU Cougar Health Services (cougarhealth.wsu.edu/medical-clinic/services/), and/or from local advocacy groups (e.g. Alternatives to Violence of the Palouse, located in Pullman: atvp.org)and 24-hour telephone: 509-332-4357)(for a list of state-wide advocacy groups, visit : https://www.wcsap.org/help/csap-by-city).

Reporting to Law Enforcement

For incidents that are currently occurring, recently occurred, or need immediate assistance, please dial 911. For incidents of a non-emergency nature, please dial 509-332-2521. All calls will be answered by Whitcom, the local emergency dispatch center, which manages consolidated dispatch operations for police, fire, and EMS units for multiple counties, including Whitman County. A dispatcher will collect your information and determine the appropriate police, fire, and/or medical aid required.

Reporting a Property Crime

  1. Report your loss or damages to the police department as soon as possible – Report to law enforcement by calling 509-332-2521.
  2. Don’t touch anything until police are able to examine the area.
  3. Be prepared to provide serial numbers or identifying marks or characteristics of the items taken.
  4. Be alert for more damage or items missing that may come to your attention.
  5. Itemize your valuables and write down serial numbers.
  6. Mark your items for identification with your driver’s license number.
  7. If you have unique or valuable items, photograph them and keep the pictures or video with your list of serial numbers.

Reporting an Assault (Physical and/or Sexual)

  1. Report the assault to police as soon as possible — dial 911. May also report to the university and/or seek confidential services through WSU Cougar Health Counseling and Psychological Services. They can be contacted at 509-335-4511, and are located on the 3rd floor of the Washington Building.
  2. If you’ve been injured, seek medical attention. When you call to report, tell the communications center you’ve been hurt. They will assist you in getting aid.
  3. If it is a sexual assault, refrain from showering, washing your hands, or washing your clothes. This will help preserve evidence that may be necessary to prove a criminal offense.
  4. Support and counseling resources are available. The Directory of Services lists referral numbers, see https://police.wsu.edu/directory-of-campus-services/. If you don’t know who to call, ask the police officer.

Reporting to Campus Security Authorities

Community members, students, faculty, and staff should promptly report all crimes and other emergencies occurring on-campus directly to law enforcement at 509-332-2521, or by dialing 911. Additionally, in accordance with the Clery Act, WSU has identified several Campus Security Authorities (CSAs) to whom campus community members can provide information for reporting purposes. The Clery Act recognizes certain WSU officials and offices as CSAs, who are an “official of an institution who has significant responsibility for student and campus activities, including, but not limited to, student housing, student discipline, and campus judicial disciplinary proceedings.” A pastoral or professional counselor within the institution is not considered a campus security authority when “acting as a pastoral or professional counselor,” and is not required to report crimes for inclusion into the annual disclosure of crime statistics.

The CSAs report incidents for the purpose of inclusion in the statistics provided in this report to the WSU Police Department directly or by using the online CSA Reporting form at www.crci.edu/csa/.

Although there are many CSAs; WSU officially designates the following key departments and/or titles as locations where individuals should report crimes for the purpose of making timely warning reports and the annual statistical disclosure. For additional information regarding CSAs and additional WSU administrators recognized as CSAs, please visit crci.wsu.edu/csa/.

WSU Police Department | 2201 E. Grimes Way PO Box 641072 | Emergency – 911 | Non-Emergency – 509-332-2521

Title IX Coordinator | French Administration 134, PO Box 641022 | 509-335-8288

Office of Civil Rights Compliance and Investigation | French Administration 225, PO Box 641022 | 509-335-8288

Center for Community Standards | French Administration 130, PO Box 641040 | 509-335-4532

Department of Housing and Residence Life | Streit-Perham Administration Suite, PO Box 641722 | 509-335-1227

Office of the Dean of Students | French Administration 122, PO Box 641013 | 509-335-5757

Executive Director of Cougar Health Services | Washington Building, PO Box 642302 | 509-335-3575

Reporting to a University Department

In addition to reporting to law enforcement or a CSA, individuals may directly report crime perpetrated by students to the Center for Community Standards, for review under the WSU Standards of Conduct for Students.

Center for Community Standards | French Administration 130, PO Box 641040 | 509-335-4532 | Report online: communitystandards.wsu.edu/forms/

Similarly, individuals may report crimes implicating the WSU Policy Prohibiting Discrimination, Sexual Harassment, and Sexual Misconduct, Executive Policy 15 (EP 15), to the Title IX Coordinator or the Office of Civil Rights Compliance and Investigation. More information on reporting:

Title IX Coordinator | French Administration 134, PO Box 641022 | 509-335-8288

Office of Civil Rights Compliance and Investigation | French Administration 225, PO Box 641022 | 509-335-8288 | Report online: crci.wsu.edu/file-a-complaint/

In addition, consistent with WSU’s Policy Prohibiting Discrimination, Sexual Harassment, and Sexual Misconduct, Executive Policy 15 (EP 15), all WSU employees, with limited exceptions, are required to report an incident or situation involving sexual harassment or sexual misconduct to the Office of Civil Rights Compliance and Investigation or to one of the designated Title IX Coordinators. Similarly, individuals with supervisory responsibilities are required to report incidents or situations involving discrimination to the Office of Civil Rights Compliance and Investigation. Additional information on reporting requirements, including information on those exempt from reporting under EP 15, can be found at crci.wsu.edu/reporting-requirements-2/.

General Tips for Staying Safe

Most crime is committed as a result of opportunity. The best prevention is to eliminate opportunities.

  1. Keep your residence doors, including residence hall room doors, locked at all times.
  2. Lock up electronics and other valuables.
  3. Report suspicious persons or activities.
  4. Report safety hazards, unsafe lighting, and defective equipment.
  5. Avoid walking alone at night. Let people know where you are going.
  6. Plan your walk by choosing a safe, well-lighted, and populated route.
  7. Be aware of your surroundings. Know where you are and where you are going. Know what to expect.
  8. Get to know your roommates and neighbors. Encourage checking on each other often.
  9. If consuming alcohol or other substances, do so safely. Pour your own drinks and use the buddy system when going out with friends.
  10. Learn non-violent intervention techniques to help your fellow Cougs. Sign up for a bystander intervention training through Cougar Health Services.

 


Section 5 | Walking Escort and Transportation Services

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WSU offers a variety of transportation options for students, faculty, staff, and WSU community members. In addition to purchasing a parking permit, individuals may also consider other transportation options and resources including, but not limited to, the following:

Active Transport Options

WSU is committed to providing all WSU community members enjoyable pedestrian and bicycle transportation options and infrastructure. Additional information about trails, paths, and bike share options can be found online at: transportation.wsu.edu/ActiveTransportation

Park and Ride

Park and ride services are available for those who live outside of Pullman and want to park for free off campus and ride the transit to campus. Park and ride services are available to employees at no cost in certain parking lots and on-street parking locations around Pullman. Contact Transportation Services at 509-335-7275 for more information on Park and Ride locations.

Zipcar

For individuals who do not have a car on campus but would like to get around, Zipcars are parked on campus and provide 24/7 access to available Zipcar vehicles. Additional information can be found online at transportation.wsu.edu/TransportationAlternativesZipcar

Pullman Public Transportation

The City of Pullman provides public transportation throughout the city. The scheduled times vary. A copy of each schedule is available at the Public Safety Building, Transportation Services, and the Brelsford WSU Visitor Center in addition to various locations on campus. For additional information, including routes and schedules, please visit pullman-wa.gov/departments/pullman-transit/52-departments/pullman-transit/1165-routes-schedules

Pullman Transit

(bus) 509-332-6535

pullman-wa.gov/departments/pullman-transit

Wheatland Express

(bus) 509-334-2200

wheatlandexpress.com/

Dial-a-Ride

(elderly or disabled) 509-332-5471

pullman-wa.gov/departments/pullman-transit/dial-a-ride

Walking Escort

The Washington State University Police Department Cadet Program provides security escorts to students. To schedule a walking escort, please contact 509-432-2328.

COUGAR ACCESSIBLE TRANSIT SERVICES

WSU Transportation Services operates a wheelchair accessible transportation service for on-campus trips only for those with permanent or temporary mobility disabilities/conditions. Rides are scheduled on an individualized first-come, first-served basis. The CATS service area is limited to campus facilities and Greek housing. CATS does not provide transportation to or from any other locations (e.g. of-campus non-WSU housing, community businesses). Please contact their office at 509-432-4875, or access.van@wsu.edu

Additional alternative transportation options and resources are available on the Transportation Services website at transportation.wsu.edu/transportation-options/.


Section 6 | About the WSU Police Department

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Commitment to Safety

The Washington State University Police Department (WSU PD) strives to educate the campus community and maintain a reasonably safe environment on campus. In 2018, WSU PD personnel provided 103 educational and prevention driven programs to students. Additionally, each residence hall on campus has an assigned police officer representative that works closely with hall staff to provide general crime prevention and safety programs for the residents. Although WSU PD takes many steps to educate and maintain safety on campus, each individual within the campus community plays a role and it is important to be aware of surroundings and use reasonable judgment when living, working, or visiting on campus. Please report suspicious or criminal activities to law enforcement at 509-332-2521 or 911.

Role, Authority, and Training

The WSU PD is empowered through Chapter 43.101 of the Revised Code of Washington, and has the authority to arrest. Each WSU PD officer receives the same basic training as city and county peace officers throughout Washington State in addition to training specific to the unique needs of a campus environment. The WSU campus and various WSU-operated properties represents the primary jurisdiction of WSU PD. WSU PD handles all patrol, investigation, crime prevention education, and related law enforcement duties for the campus community. WSU PD operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week and provides service by vehicle, bicycle, and on foot.

The WSU Police Department is Comprised of:

  • 21 Sworn Officers
  • 55 Student Cadets
  • 5 Support Services Staff Members
  • 1 Fire and Safety Compliance Officer

Cadet Program

The WSU Police Corps program is operated through WSU PD and is designed as a training program for students interested in a career in law enforcement. The cadets complete an annual training academy of over 100 hours. After completing training, they are allowed to ride along with officers of WSU PD, Pullman Police Department (PD), and Whitman County Sheriff’s Office to gain hands-on experience in the field of law enforcement. Officers of these participating agencies mentor and guide the students in this program which has proven to be valuable hands-on experience. The program also provides security for the general campus area, veterinary medicine, athletic events, and other general events on campus. This program has proven its success by annually producing quality law enforcement officer recruits to agencies around the state.

Jurisdiction and Working Relationship with Local, State, and Federal Law Enforcement Agencies

WSU PD maintains a collaborative and close relationship with the City of Pullman PD, especially when addressing matters that impact the WSU campus and community. Local collaboration includes interoperative radio capability, a joint police records computer system (with the City and County), training programs, and at times, investigation of incidents. Additionally, WSU PD also collaborates with the Whitman County Sheriff’s Office, the Washington State Patrol, and various state and federal law enforcement agencies.

Generally, WSU PD does not provide law enforcement services to off-campus residences or properties of students and student organizations. Pullman PD typically provides these services. WSU relies on the close working relationship with Pullman PD to receive information about incidents involving WSU students and recognized student organizations.

All recognized WSU student organizations must abide by federal, state, and local laws and WSU policies. WSU may become involved in off-campus conduct of students and recognized student organizations when such conduct is determined to affect a substantial university interest, as defined in the Standards of Conduct for Students Policy at communitystandards.wsu.edu, among other university policies.


Section 7 | Timely Warnings

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Timely Warnings

The Clery Act requires that “institutions must issue a timely warning for any Clery Act crime that occurs within Clery geography that is: (i) reported to campus security authorities; and (ii) is considered by the institution to represent a serious or continuing threat to students and employees.” For the definitions of Clery Act crimes, please see Section 13 (definitions under state law are also included in Section 22 and Section 23). For the definition of Clery geography, please see Section 24.

According to the Clery Act, the timely warning must be issued in a timely manner and will withhold the names and personally identifying information about the victims as defined within Section 40002(a) (20) of the Violence Against Women Act of 1994.

The timely warning will aid in the prevention of similar crimes, which may include incidents where the WSU Police Department (WSU PD) has identified a pattern of risk. A timely warning with respect to crimes reported to a pastoral or professional counselor is not required by WSU.

A timely warning may be issued for a crime or incident as deemed necessary or appropriate by the WSU PD. Taking into account the safety of the community, WSU PD’s officer-in-charge, or the above level, will assume the primary responsibility to determine the content, issue a timely warning notification, and initiate the appropriate elements of the notification system. In instances where there is a significant emergency or dangerous situation involving an immediate threat to the health and safety of students or employees occurring on the campus, WSU will follow its emergency notification procedures (see Section 8).

WSU PD makes determinations as to when a timely warning may be issued, which may vary on a case-by-case basis. Some examples of matters requiring timely warnings include, but are not limited to:

  • Investigations of a series of car thefts in one particular area
  • Unsolved burglaries
  • A pattern of drug dealings or activities that puts students at risk

Dissemination of a Timely Warning

WSU PD uses the WSU Alert system (alert.wsu.edu) as the primary method of distributing notification of a timely warning; however, additional communications tools may also be used, including, WSU Insider, a press release, and the WSU campus outdoor warning system. All WSU students, staff, and faculty can subscribe and update their information for the WSU Alert system by accessing their MyWSU account. See alert.wsu.edu for more information.

 


Section 8 | Emergency Response and Evacuation Procedures

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Emergency Notification

In the event of a significant emergency or dangerous situation involving an immediate threat to the health and safety of students or employees occurring on the campus, the WSU PD will determine and employ communication methods appropriate to the situation to notify the affected university community without delay. Confirmation of significant emergencies will require direct investigation by appropriate WSU personnel.

For all campus law enforcement issues, the WSU PD will be primarily responsible for confirming a significant emergency or dangerous public safety situation on campus through victim, witness, or officer observations. Taking into account the safety of the community, WSU PD’s officer-in-charge, or the above level, will assume the primary responsibility to determine the content, issue campus emergency notifications, and initiate the appropriate elements of the emergency notification system unless the notification will, in the professional judgment of responsible authorities, compromise efforts to assist victims or to contain, respond to, or otherwise mitigate the emergency. Additional information about WSU’s policies and procedures in place to respond to emergencies is available from the WSU Pullman Office of Emergency Management: oem.wsu.edu/.

Other non-law enforcement emergencies such as hazardous materials releases, utility failures, computer systems/telecommunications failures, hazardous weather, infectious disease or public hazards, etc., may affect the WSU campus. Other departments at WSU, including, but not limited to, Emergency Management, Environmental Health and Safety, the Office of Research Assurances, Facilities Services, Information Technology, or Cougar Health Services may also confirm a significant emergency. Confirming departments will report the non-law enforcement emergency to the WSU PD and/or the University Emergency Management Coordinator, or their designee, who has the primary responsibility to prepare and issue non-law enforcement emergency notifications. Whether the emergency is a law enforcement or non-law enforcement issue, those authorized to issue emergency notifications will be responsible for determining the appropriate segment or segments of the campus community to notify. Incident circumstances may require only a floor, building, facility, area, etc. to be notified as compared to the entire campus. Examples of situations that could require immediate emergency notifications could include:

  • A dangerous assailant for aggravated assault, robbery, arson, rape, murder (even if a suspect is in custody), etc.
  • An occurring or impending natural disaster, or an occurring or impending man-made disaster

An emergency notification will include information that would enable members of the university community to take actions to protect themselves, including information about the type of incident, location and instructions on what actions to take, and other safety tips.

Dissemination of an Emergency Notification

WSU has a number of methods to provide warning and notification of emergency situations affecting the campus, including the Campus Outdoor Warning System and the WSU Alert system.

The Campus Outdoor Warning System consists of five (5) siren/public address units on the Pullman campus that WSU may sound in the event of an emergency that may threaten the safety of individuals moving about the Pullman campus. The siren tone warning will be followed by a voice announcement that provides information on what individuals should do as an emergency situation develops.

The WSU Alert system is a second method for distributing a notification of an emergency warning, which connects directly to students, faculty, and staff using voice and text messaging by telephone and email to provide warning of an emergency. It will include basic directions on what steps people should take in response. Receiving emergency warning on personal cell phones, land line phones, and email requires registration. Registration can be accomplished by accessing a MyWSU account. All WSU students, staff, and faculty can subscribe and update their information for the WSU Alert system by accessing the MyWSU account. See alert.wsu.edu for more information.

In addition to these primary notification methods, the WSU Office of Emergency Management also operates a campus-wide alert email list server which allows email transmission of warnings and other messages to the campus population.

To address the recent disturbing trends of violence on campuses for K-12 and higher education, the WSU security community has developed a number of prevention and protection measures for mitigating such threat.

This includes the ability of the WSU PD and/or the WSU Office of Emergency Management to lock some WSU Pullman building doors from the outside through an automated system. Studies compiled by the FBI indicate the importance of active access control in buildings and the ability to lock down the campus entry doors and allow occupants to secure themselves within their surroundings. This function provides safety to the occupants of the building and allows for transit time for police to respond and address the incident. WSU would like to expand the availability of this locking feature to more buildings on all campuses.

The complete WSU Alert system allows the university to disseminate official information via email text messages, telephone, loudspeakers, WSU Alert website (alert.wsu.edu), and other means to notify the campus population of emergencies or threatening situations.

For example, should an active shooter situation occur, individuals would be made aware of the incident through the WSU Alert system. Individuals could then assess their response to the situation based on the location and resources available and then choose the best action to ensure their safety.

All WSU students, staff and faculty can subscribe and update their information, such as email, telephone numbers, etc., for notifications through the WSU Alert system by accessing their MyWSU account. See alert.wsu.edu for more information.

Drills, Exercises and Training

WSU holds an emergency communications systems test once a semester. The test includes activation of the WSU Alert system, Campus Outdoor Warning System, and the WSU Alert website (alert.wsu.edu). Other methods of emergency communication may also be activated during these tests. These tests may be previously scheduled and announced to the community or may be unannounced.

WSU holds drills or exercises for campus emergency responders and emergency management personnel at least once each semester and conducts follow-through activities designed for assessment and evaluation of existing emergency response plans, procedures, and capabilities. Whenever possible, emergency responders from local agencies participate in these exercises or drills with WSU emergency responders. WSU publishes a summary of its emergency response and evacuation procedures in conjunction with at least one drill or exercise each calendar year.

On-campus residence halls hold an evacuation drills four (4) times annually per the International Fire Code. Students learn the locations of emergency exits in the buildings and are provided guidance about the direction they should travel when exiting each facility for a short-term evacuation. WSU does not tell residents in advance about the designated locations for long-term evacuations because those decisions are affected by time of day, locations of the building being evacuated, the availability of various designated emergency gathering locations on campus, and other factors such as the location and nature of the threat. All other WSU units are encouraged to hold an evacuation drill at least once annually or more frequently when required by the International Fire Code.

An officer will assist any unit to coordinate an evacuation drill and provide an assessment of its effectiveness. The WSU Fire and Safety Compliance Officer will be responsible for maintaining records of each of these evacuation drills for seven years as required by the Clery Act. The Office of Emergency Management maintains records of all drills and exercises established for campus emergency responders as well as for emergency communications systems tests. The Office of Emergency Management annually publishes information on emergency response and evacuation procedures in conjunction with the test and maintains the records for seven years as required by the Clery Act. The records include, for each test, a description of the exercise, the date, the time, and whether it was announced or unannounced.

WSU PD provides active shooter training, safety consultations, and can share information about online trainings and resources. Individuals interested in additional information should contact WSU PD at 509-335-8548.


Section 9 | Security of and Access to WSU Facilities

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Campus Housing Safety

The WSU Housing and Residence Life (Residence Life) staff work closely with the WSU Police Department (WSU PD) and other safety officials to make living groups safe and secure communities. All students in WSU housing and residence halls must ultimately share in this responsibility. New students and Residence Life staff should familiarize themselves with campus resources including safety resources and evacuation locations for the residence hall/apartment they live in. Residence Life staff can answer questions and assist with problems. Residence Life hall staff are on duty each evening and three professional staff are on call 24/7 to help increase security. Staff members perform nightly rounds and have an on-call system during evenings and weekends from 7:00 p.m. to 8:00 a.m. Residence halls are secured 24 hours a day. Only residents of the halls and authorized university personnel can gain access. All residence halls have fire sprinkler systems. WSU apartments for single students and families are supervised by the apartment coordinator in each complex and by the residents. WSU PD officers routinely patrol these areas, and during the scheduled summer and winter breaks, residents may request walkthroughs by WSU PD by contacting their office at 509-335-8548. All safety-related questions or concerns should be directed to the WSU Housing and Residence Life staff at 509-335-1227, Streit-Perham Admin Suite, PO Box 641722.

Safety Considerations in the Maintenance of Campus Facilities

WSU devotes time from various campus resources including Facilities Services and Environmental Health and Safety to address the safety and security of the campus. The key distribution for academic buildings is controlled by the colleges and departments within the building. The buildings are opened in the mornings and secured in the evening by Facilities Services. WSU PD officers patrol these areas regularly. WSU PD provides several services designed to enhance the safety of all WSU community members:

  • A yearly “Walk in the Dark” to survey areas of the campus in need of enhanced lighting or shrub and tree trimming.
  • Regular monitoring of lighting levels on campus and evaluation of the security to student residences.
  • The availability of blue light emergency phones around campus.

Students Events and Organization

Groups or individuals may use the university’s limited public forum areas for those activities protected by the first amendment to the Constitution of the United States, subject to the requirements set forth in 504-33 WAC. University groups or individuals are requested to provide notice of the intended use of the desired Pullman Campus limited public forum area to the WSU PD. Non-university groups and individuals must provide notice five business days prior to the intended use of the desired limited public forum area, in accordance with WAC 504-33-025.

Registered Student Organizations and enrolled WSU students may contact the WSU Student Involvement Office for more information about campus events at:

WSU Office of Student Involvement
Compton Union Building 320
509-335-9667
sild.infodesk@wsu.edu
studentinvolvement.wsu.edu

Blue Light Phones

Should you need immediate assistance in an emergency, you can look for a blue light. The blue light identifies the location of an emergency telephone. Simply press the emergency telephone button (no dialing is necessary) to be connected to the Whitcom 911 Center. Describe your emergency to the dispatcher. Every call placed from a blue light phone is responded to by a police officer. Please take notice of the location of the blue light telephones as you move throughout the campus. You may never need to use one, but they are there for emergencies.

Elevator Telephones

Emergency telephones are located in the elevators for both academic and residence hall buildings. Simply push the button marked “Emergency Phone” and you will be connected to the Whitcom 911 Center. Every telephone call placed by an elevator telephone is responded to by a police officer. If you are stuck, remain calm and stay inside the elevator. Only trained elevator personnel are authorized to remove trapped occupants. No one else should attempt to release them or to force elevator doors open. The elevator telephone is for emergencies ONLY; please refrain from using the telephone unless it is an emergency.

 


Section 10 | Sex and Gender Violence Education and Prevention Efforts

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WSU is committed to fostering a safe and secure environment for students, staff, faculty, and visitors, free of all forms of discrimination, which includes sex and gender-based violence, including those crimes defined in Section 13. WSU demonstrates its commitment to these principles by equipping our community with the knowledge, skills, and resources to maintain a safe and welcoming environment for everyone. WSU has adopted policies and procedures to address incidents of sexual violence, which includes sexual assault, sexual exploitation, dating violence, domestic violence, and stalking. WSU policies apply to all students, staff, faculty, contracted employees, and visitors. The processes in place allow WSU to address conduct that occurs on and off campus and serves as a separate and distinct process from the criminal process. For additional information, see Section 11 and Section 12 or visit the Office of Civil Rights Compliance and Investigation website at crci.wsu.edu.

WSU has an obligation to address concerns related to sexual violence upon learning of an incident.

All employees of WSU, with limited exceptions, are required to report any information relating to allegations of sexual harassment, including sexual violence, to the WSU Title IX Coordinator. Reports can be made in a variety of ways, including online, in person, by phone, or through staff or employees of WSU. For more information on this requirement, including the limited exceptions, please visit the Office of Civil Rights Compliance and Investigation (CRCI) website at crci.wsu.edu/reporting-requirements-2/, or contact the office by telephone at 509-335-8288.

After CRCI becomes aware of a concern, the WSU Title IX Coordinator or a representative from CRCI will contact the individual who experienced the conduct to provide information on WSU policy, reporting options, and resources available on campus and within the community. The victim/survivor is not obligated to report the incident to WSU or law enforcement. WSU will not provide the information to law enforcement, unless the victim/survivor would like assistance in doing so or under limited exceptions as required to do so by state or federal law, such as the victim/survivor being a minor.

Any person who experiences sexual violence may report to the Office of Civil Rights Compliance and Investigation at 509-335-8288, French Administration Room 225, Pullman, Washington 99164, by email at crci@wsu.edu, or online at crci.wsu.edu/file-a-complaint/.

Prevention and Education Programs Regarding Sexual Assault, Sexual Exploitation, Dating Violence, Domestic Violence And Stalking:

WSU provides a range of education and prevention programs to strengthen prevention efforts, further develop campus-wide understanding of policy and processes, and enhance accessibility to services for victim/survivors of such violence. WSU regularly provides all students with information about reporting options via email messages, as well as through in-person trainings specifically designed to explain available processes. WSU also produces an array of online and printed materials for students and employees about accessing support services and making complaints regarding sexual violence, including sexual assault, sexual exploitation, dating violence, domestic violence, and stalking.

BYSTANDER INTERVENTION

WSU understands that keeping our community safe requires everyone on campus to be proactive. To that end, all WSU students on the Pullman campus receive training on the role bystanders play in reducing risk on campus. Often when bystanders see situations that could lead to violence, our tendency is to walk away. We may feel unsure about our role in the situation or may be concerned for our physical safety. Even so, there are safe and positive options available to intervene in situations that may lead to acts of violence. These options include:

  • Being direct. If you see someone doing something that is making another person uncomfortable, speak up.
  • Getting someone else involved. If you feel like you can’t handle the situation on your own, ask a group of friends to help you, or talk to a supervisor, Resident Advisor, or other person of authority. If the situation is making you feel unsafe, contact the police.
  • Creating a distraction. Sometimes the best way to get someone out of a potentially dangerous situation is to divert attention elsewhere.
  • If a situation is making you uncomfortable, chances are other people are uncomfortable too. By standing up and being a proactive bystander, you give other people encouragement to do the same.
  • Being proactive. There are small and simple actions that Cougs can take every day to create a safe and supportive campus. For more information about your role as a bystander, consider attending a bystander intervention training through Cougar Health Services.

Risk Reduction

WSU believes that it is not a victim/survivor’s decisions that lead to acts of harm or violence. Rather, someone else is making choices to cause harm to another person. Reducing rates of violence on our campus can seem overwhelming, but it becomes a much easier task when we all work together. There are steps everyone can take to promote individual and community safety on campus that are also provided to all incoming students at the Pullman campus:

  • Plan ahead. Charge your phone before going out and stay in contact with your friends throughout the evening. Ask friends to check in with each other before leaving for the night. If someone doesn’t check in, call or text to make sure they’re okay.
  • Make a back-up plan if things don’t go as planned. Bring extra cash if you need to call a cab to get home, or call a trusted friend to walk you home if you feel unsafe walking alone at night.
  • Pay attention to your gut instincts. If a situation feels uncomfortable, find someone you trust, or leave. Contact the police if you have concerns for your safety.
  • If choosing to drink alcohol, be aware of how your body responds to drinking and plan accordingly. Plan out how many drinks you’ll have and stick to that plan. Eat a full meal before going out, or eat snacks throughout the night. Alternate between alcoholic and non-alcoholic drinks or beverages.
  • Respect everyone’s personal boundaries in all situations, including those involving sex. Consent at WSU must be clear, knowing, and voluntary. If you’re not certain you’ve obtained consent, stop and check in with your partner.

EMPLOYEE TRAINING

WSU mandates training for all university employees on the WSU Policy Prohibiting Discrimination, Sexual Harassment, and Sexual Misconduct (Executive Policy #15), which includes information on reporting responsibilities and best practices. In addition, the WSU Office of Civil Rights Compliance and Investigation (CRCI) regularly provides additional training about sexual violence and trauma-informed response information to local law enforcement, appeals board members, university conduct board members, Administrative Law Judges overseeing full adjudicative hearings, and other staff who work with students. Employees for CRCI and the Center for Community Standards receive continuous training throughout the year on topics related to all forms of discrimination, including sexual assault, sexual exploitation, dating violence, domestic violence, and stalking, as well as how to conduct investigations and hearing processes that protect the safety of victims/survivors and promotes accountability.

ADDITIONAL TRAINING OPPORTUNITIES

Mandatory Education for Incoming Students:

Every incoming undergraduate student goes through three required education programs on the WSU Pullman campus, about bystander intervention, risk reduction, and the definitions and WSU policies in place to respond to sexual assault, sexual exploitation, intimate partner violence and stalking.

  • Safety on Campus:
    • This workshop is offered during the Alive! Orientation and includes information about campus policies, resources and reporting options for students.
  • Green Dot:
    • Students attend an introduction to the Green Dot bystander intervention program to learn how to recognize and respond to situations that could be high risk for violence.
  • Booze, Sex, and Reality Checks:
    • This workshop helps students transition into our university’s social experience and culture, and includes education about consent and sexual decision making. Students under the age of 21 as of the first day of the month of the semester in which they are starting are required to complete this program.
  • e-CHUG:
    • This online, confidential survey allows students to receive personalized feedback about the impacts of alcohol and other drug use. First year students, and incoming transfer students under the age of 21, are required to complete this online survey; however, it is an open access survey, and available to all students. Information on e-CHUG is available at: cougarhealth.wsu.edu/echug.

Most students complete these requirements during Alive! Orientation and Week of Welcome. Students cannot register for a second semester without completing these education programs.

Other programs designed to enhance understanding about sexual assault, sexual exploitation, intimate partner violence, and stalking are provided throughout the academic year. These interactive programs are open to all students on the WSU Pullman campus. Students can sign up for programs at orgsync.com/62397/chapter.

Ally Training

The Gender Identity/Expression and Sexual Orientation Resource Center (GIESORC) is respectful of confidentiality and is knowledgeable about resources for members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer community. WSU promotes an atmosphere that is safe, inclusive, and affirming for all members of the campus community and does not condone discrimination. Any faculty, staff, student, or community member may participate in Ally training. For more information please contact the Gender Identity/Expression and Sexual Orientation Resource Center at 509-335-8841 or visit thecenter.wsu.edu.

Discrimination and Sexual Harassment Prevention Training

The Office of Civil Rights Compliance and Investigation offers a number of trainings for students, faculty, and staff in person and via video-conferencing software, including trainings on discrimination and sexual harassment prevention. Please visit crci.wsu.edu/education-training for information on upcoming scheduled trainings, or to request in person training through an online form.

Cultural Competency Training

The Office of Outreach and Education (OED), formerly the Office of Equity and Diversity, offers a variety of workshops related to equity and inclusion that provide a link between theory and practical application of concepts related to engaging across difference. These workshops help participants build skills through experiential opportunities that are conducive to an inclusive and engaged campus climate and work environment. Faculty, staff, and administrators may register for Equity Education sessions (currently, the Equity 101 Workshop) via HRS Skillsoft or contact the Office of Outreach and Education to schedule additional workshops at 509-335-5078. In addition, student Peer-to-Peer training is available for student groups presented by the WSU Social Justice Peer Educator Project. To learn more about all training and workshops offered through the Office of Outreach and Education, please visit the OED website at diversity.wsu.edu/diversity-education/.

If You Or A Friend Experiences Sexual Violence, Including Sexual Assault, Sexual Exploitation, Dating Violence, Domestic Violence, and Stalking

There are several options in seeking care for an individual impacted by sexual violence, which includes sexual assault, sexual exploitation, dating violence, domestic violence and stalking. WSU provides access to both confidential and non-confidential resources. Victims/survivors are encouraged to access whichever resource they feel most comfortable with.

A current listing of resources for victims/survivors can be found on the Office of Civil Rights Compliance and Investigation website at crci.wsu.edu/resources. Victims/survivors can choose to seek medical care, even if they are unsure whether they want to make a police report or if they choose not to move forward with a criminal investigation.

A healthcare provider can help assess wellbeing and personal safety, provide any necessary medical treatment and refer students to counseling and other resources.

Healthcare providers at both Cougar Health Services and Pullman Regional Hospital offer Sexual Assault Forensic Exams to collect physical evidence for use in a law enforcement investigation and possible prosecution. Victims/survivors do not have to speak to the police in order to receive a forensic exam. Healthcare providers will explain the exam process before beginning and can answer any questions about what will happen during the exam. It is important to preserve any evidence that may be necessary to prove a criminal offense. Preservation includes refraining from showering or bathing and saving articles of clothing worn during the assault. Victims/survivors have the option to be accompanied by a support person, such as a friend or an advocate, during medical appointments.

Within the community, Alternatives to Violence of the Palouse (ATVP) also provides support to victims/survivors, as well as support for friends and family of victims/survivors. Their services are free a confidential. ATVP can be reached on their 24-hour telephone line at 509-332-4357.

Importance Of Preserving Evidence For An Incident Of Sexual Assault, Sexual Exploitation, Dating Violence, Domestic Violence, Or Stalking

When an incident of sexual violence occurs, it is important to preserve evidence to aid in a criminal prosecution, university response, and/or in obtaining a protection order. Evidence of physical harm, such as bruising or other visible injuries, should be documented by photographic evidence. Evidence of stalking including communication, such as text messages, voice mail, written notes, social media postings, or any other electronic communication should be saved and not altered in any way. In cases of sexual assault, avoid showering, using a toilet, or changing clothing prior to a medical examination. Any clothing removed should be placed in a bag.


Section 11 | Support and Reporting Options for Survivors of Sexual Violence, including Sexual Assault, Sexual Exploitation, Intimate Partner violence, and Stalking

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WSU has a strong history of providing services and support to victims/survivors of sexual violence, which includes sexual assault, sexual exploitation, dating violence, domestic violence, and stalking. WSU regularly provides students and employees written notice about reporting options and existing resource including counseling, health, mental health, victim advocacy, legal assistance, visa and immigration assistance, and student financial aid. WSU has established relationships with confidential advocacy groups in each of the communities where our campuses are located as well as with agencies in other parts of Washington. Within Pullman, Alternatives to Violence of the Palouse (ATVP) provides free and confidential services to victims/survivors of sexual violence. ATVP has an office located on the Pullman campus (Washington Bldg, 3rd Floor), in addition to an office located within the community at 115 NW State St #305, Pullman, Washington 99163.

Additionally, WSU offers access to counseling services on each of our campuses to all WSU students and employees as well as support to students and employees in accessing local health services with 24-hour access to counseling services and sexual assault forensic exams at Cougar Health Services on the Pullman campus. Sexual assault forensic exams are also offered at most of the major hospitals that serve WSU communities. Financial assistance may also be available for medical care after an assault even if the victim/survivor chooses not to undergo a forensic exam. These are all confidential resources. WSU provides support in coordinating services and referrals to partner agencies for all victims/survivors engaged in our process, on each of our campuses.

WSU may be able to assist victims/survivors with changes to academic schedules, living arrangements, working arrangements, or take other protective measures to provide support. WSU will assist in obtaining this support when the victim/survivor requests the services and when the services are reasonably available, regardless of whether the victim/survivor chooses to report the incident to WSU or law enforcement for investigation. The Office of the Dean of Students is available to assist in implementing assistance measures to support students impacted by sexual violence.


Reporting Options for Incidents of Sexual Violence

There are several reporting options available if a student, employee, or visitor of WSU has experienced an incident of sexual violence, which includes sexual assault, sexual exploitation, dating violence, domestic violence, and stalking. In the case of an emergency or ongoing threat, get to a safe location if possible and report the incident by calling 911. If necessary, a victim/survivor should seek medical services as soon as possible for their physical well-being and the purpose of preserving evidence.

WSU encourages victims and other individuals who are aware of sexual violence to report. WSU also believes in providing survivors with autonomy in their reporting choices, as well as multiple reporting options of a confidential and non-confidential nature. Survivors can choose from one or more of the following options:

  • Report to law enforcement for the purposes of:
    • Information Only
    • Partial Information
    • Complete Investigation
  • Report to the WSU Office of Civil Rights Compliance and Investigation
  • Report Anonymously
  • Seek Confidential support through WSU’s Cougar Health Services, a local advocacy agency (e.g. Alternatives to Violence of the Palouse) or other confidential resources.

Even if a survivor does not want to report an experience, survivors are still encouraged to seek support from the Office of Civil Rights Compliance and Investigation, WSU Police Department, the Office of the Dean of Students, Cougar Health Services. A report is not required to request services.

The below sections describe in more detail the various reporting and support options.

Confidential Counseling Protected By Law

Anyone who has experienced sexual violence may choose to consult with a licensed mental health care provider or health care provider of their choice. By law, such professionals are able to assist victims confidentially and are exempt from legal obligations to report incidents to the university, with some limited exceptions, such as child abuse, elder abuse, or certain threats of harm.

A victim/survivor may decide to disclose the incident to a confidential resource, local law enforcement, and/or may report to the Office of Civil Rights Compliance and Investigation (CRCI) for an investigative response by WSU, or to local law enforcement. A victim/survivor may decline to notify authorities, including CRCI and/or law enforcement. CRCI can also assist the victim/survivor in notifying law enforcement, if a victim/survivor elects to do so. CRCI will not share information regarding reports made to the university with law enforcement, unless required to do so by law or requested to do so by the victim/survivor.

WSU policy prohibits retaliation against anyone who reports or participates in an investigative or disciplinary process by WSU. Please note, WSU employees and student employees may have reporting requirements and be required to provide information to CRCI. For more information, please visit crci.wsu.edu/reporting-requirements-2.

In most instances, service providers from the following resources can speak with victims/survivors confidentially about their concerns:

On-Campus Confidential Resources

WSU Cougar Health Services | Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) (for students) | Call 509-332-2159 for evening and weekend crisis services | cougarhealth.wsu.edu/counseling/

WSU Cougar Health Services | Medical Clinic (for students) | cougarhealth.wsu.edu/medical-clinic/services/

WSU Employee Assistance Program (for employees) | 1-877-313-4455 | hrs.wsu.edu/resources/employee-assistance-program

Off-Campus Confidential Resources

Alternatives to Violence of the Palouse (ATVP) | 24-hour line: 509-332-4357 | atvp.org

Pullman Regional Hospital | pullmanregional.org

Northwest Justice Project Free Legal Hotline (CLEAR) | nwjustice.org

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline | 800-273-8255 or 800-273-TALK

 

Reporting to the WSU Office of Civil Rights Compliance and Investigation

Incidents of sexual violence, which includes sexual assault, sexual exploitation, intimate partner violence and stalking, can be reported to the Office of Civil Rights Compliance and Investigation (CRCI), which works closely with Human Resource Services (HRS) for incidents involving employees and the Center for Community Standards (CCS) for incidents involving students. CRCI can start an investigation, assist the victim/survivor with campus safety options, and connect the victim/survivor to local support, medical, and counseling resources. CRCI’s investigation process is separate from any criminal process and can be pursued simultaneously. Through an investigation process, CRCI determines whether the WSU Policy Prohibiting Discrimination, Sexual Harassment, and Sexual Misconduct, Executive Policy #15 has been violated and then makes recommendations to either CCS, when the respondent is a student, or to the relevant supervisor and/or HRS, when the respondent is an employee. CRCI shares information about cases only on a need-to-know basis, but cannot guarantee confidentiality. Although CRCI does not share reporting information with law enforcement unless required to do so, CRCI investigators notify victims/survivors of their option to report to on-campus or local police, to have campus authorities assist them in notifying law enforcement of a sexual violence incident, and decline to notify such authorities.

A report of sexual violence can be made to CRCI or the Title IX Coordinator by telephone at 509-335-8288, by email at crci@wsu.edu, or by visiting the CRCI office located in Room 225 of the French Administration Building on the Pullman campus. Additionally, a report can be filed online at crci.wsu.edu/file-a-complaint.

Reporting to Law Enforcement

Victims/survivors are encouraged to report to law enforcement. Even if they are not sure if they want to report for criminal investigation, they are encouraged to preserve evidence, which may include seeking a sexual assault forensic exam. Victims/survivors are also encouraged to seek care and support, including advocacy services, medical treatment and/or counseling services. Reporters are urged to preserve any evidence and to also seek medical and counseling services. Law enforcement can assist with filing criminal charges or pursuing a no contact order. To make a report of sexual violence to law enforcement, call 911 for immediate emergency assistance or contact the WSU Police Department (WSU PD) at 509-335-8548 or the Pullman Police Department (Pullman PD) 509-332-2521. For information on reporting sexual violence to WSU PD, visit the following website: police.wsu.edu/sexual-assault-investigations/.

Washington State University Amnesty Statement

WSU encourages students to report incidents of sexual violence without fear of consequences for having possessed or consumed alcohol and/or drugs at the time of the incident. WSU’s primary concern is to ensure the safety of the students involved and gather relevant information, so the University can address the student(s)’ concerns. Generally, WSU will refrain from imposing formal discipline for alcohol or drug use and/or possession under the Standards of Conduct for Students for victims and potential witnesses’ involved in situations of sexual violence in order to facilitate reporting and resolution of sexual violence concerns.

This practice will not provide relief from disciplinary action for other alleged violations of the Standards of Conduct (e.g., hazing, theft, drug/alcohol manufacturing or distribution).

Moreover, students who distribute alcohol and/or drugs that intentionally, or through negligence, contribute to the sexual violence will not be granted the same consideration.

In rare circumstances where the Center for Community Standards has concerns that a student’s repeated or severe misuse of alcohol or drugs will result in additional harm if unaddressed, the University may impose care-driven educational sanctions to address those concerns.

Interim and Protective Measures

WSU can take individualized and appropriate interim steps before a final resolution of an investigation to support and protect the students involved in the matter. Some support measures may be available regardless of whether a victim/survivor wishes to pursue a complaint or notify law enforcement. WSU provides written notice of these and other available assistance options (such as how to request changes to academic, living, transportation and working situations, and protective measures) to victims/survivors, and, as applicable, to respondents. WSU may deliver a “no-contact” directive that informs parties to refrain from having contact with one another either directly or through third parties. Other interim measures include but are not limited to, altering academic schedules, WSU dining arrangements, WSU housing, and/or WSU employment arrangements of the parties. When taking such steps, WSU seeks to minimize unnecessary or unreasonable burdens on either party. Violations of such protective measures may lead to disciplinary action. The Office of the Dean of Students is available to assist in implementing assistance measures to support victims/survivors.

Potential Interim Support Measures for Students:

The following list includes interim support measures that may be available to students or employees. Additional interim support measures may be available, as appropriate.

  1. Academic

    • Discrete request for consideration to faculty for support (e.g., receiving flexibility with deadlines, rescheduling exams, etc.)
    • Alternative course arrangements (e.g. course load reduction, adjustment to course schedule, or withdrawal)
    • Voluntary leave of absence
    • Academic support, including assisting with petition processes
    • Withdrawal without penalty
  2. Housing

    • Change in on-campus living arrangements
    • Change in dining location
    • Assistance in finding alternative housing arrangements
  3. Employment

    • Change in work schedule
    • Change in job assignment
    • Voluntary leave of absence
  4. Financial Aid

    • Emergency funds or loans
    • Potential refund of tuition and fees as a result of alternate course completion
  5. Safety

    • No contact directive and trespass from certain locations
    • Options for a walking escort
  6. Support

    • Access to counseling both on and off campus
    • Medical services
    • Support letters for WSU petition processes
    • Assistance in identifying an advocate to help secure additional resources
    • Assistance with visa and immigration procedures
  7. Transportation

    • Transportation accommodations, such as shuttle service, cab voucher, or parking

Section 12 | University Investigative Processes and Procedures for Survivors of Sexual Violence, including Sexual Assault, Sexual Exploitation, Intimate Partner violence, and Stalking

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Confidentiality In University Investigative Processes

WSU takes confidentiality seriously. During an investigation through the Office of Civil Rights Compliance and Investigation (CRCI), information is shared with others only on a need-to-know basis, which may include investigators, witnesses, the responding party, relevant WSU officials, or as required or permitted by law. Additionally, the investigation file may be subject to requests for public records. WSU redacts identifying or other information when legally permissible. The WSU PD will not release the names of victims/survivors in its Timely Warning notices, Campus Alerts, Emergency Notifications, or in the Daily Crime Log.

When a victim/survivor requests confidentiality or requests WSU not proceed with an investigation, WSU respects that request to the extent possible. WSU’s legal obligation to provide a safe and nondiscriminatory environment may require that CRCI proceed with an investigation, which may require investigators to share limited identifying information about a victim/survivor; however, CRCI takes steps to inform a victim/survivor should it become necessary to share information. In all cases, CRCI works with the victim/survivor to provide resources and support. WSU policy prohibits retaliation against anyone who reports or participates in an investigative or disciplinary process by WSU.

A victim/survivor may decline to notify authorities, including CRCI and/or law enforcement. Should the victim/survivor report the incident to CRCI, the university will not share the victim/survivor’s information with law enforcement, unless the victim/survivor requests that it be provided to law enforcement, or unless required to do so by law.

Upon written request, WSU may disclose to the alleged victim/survivor of a crime of violence, (as that term is defined in Section 16 of Title 18, United States Code), or a non-forcible sex offense, on the results of any disciplinary proceeding conducted against a student who is the alleged perpetrator of such crime or offense. If the alleged victim is deceased as a result of such crime or offense, the next of kin of such victim shall treated as the alleged victim/survivor for purposes of this paragraph.

Explanation of WSU Investigative Proceedings for Reported Incidents of Sexual Assault, Sexual Exploitation, Dating Violence, Domestic Violence, and Stalking

Upon receiving a report of sexual violence, the Office of Civil Rights Compliance and Investigation (CRCI) typically takes steps to contact the individual who experienced the alleged conduct to provide information regarding resources available at WSU and in the community. CRCI also provides information regarding the WSU Policy Prohibiting Discrimination, Sexual Harassment, and Sexual Misconduct, Executive Policy #15, the investigation process and interim measures that may be available during an investigation. CRCI investigates matters involving students, employees, and visitors regardless of whether the conduct occurred on or off campus, as appropriate, and provides a prompt, fair, and impartial investigation by officials who receive annual training on discriminatory conduct, including sexual violence, and how to conduct a trauma informed investigation. Additional information regarding CRCI’s investigative procedure is available on the CRCI website at crci.wsu.edu/investigations/.

Enforcement of the WSU Policy Prohibiting Discrimination, Sexual Harassment, Sexual Misconduct

WSU vigorously enforces Executive Policy #15 (EP 15), the Policy Prohibiting Discrimination, Sexual Harassment, Sexual Misconduct. Persons determined to have violated this policy are subject to sanctions imposed using the procedures set forth in applicable university policies and handbooks (e.g., the WSU Faculty Manual, the Administrative Professional Handbook, WAC 357-40 (civil service employees), applicable collective bargaining agreements, or WAC 504-26 containing the WSU Standards of Conduct for Students including any appeal procedures therein). Any imposed sanctions are to be adequately and appropriately severe to prevent future offenses and to protect other students and the University community. The sanctions that are imposed, or other actions taken, must be reported to CRCI by the administrator or supervisor who imposed the sanctions.

In a matter involving an employee, possible sanctions may include: (i) verbal counseling; (ii) warning, verbal and/or in writing; (iii) required training; (iv) memorandum of concern; (v) letter of reprimand; (vi) suspension without pay; (vii) demotion; (viii) termination; or (ix) any combination of the previously stated disciplinary sanctions. In addition, inappropriate and unprofessional behavior by WSU personnel that does not rise to the level of a policy violation (e.g., unwelcome sexual comments that are not sufficiently severe, persistent, or pervasive to constitute sexual harassment) may nonetheless be subject to corrective or disciplinary action in some cases.

In a matter involving a student, possible sanctions may include: (i) warning, verbal and/or in writing; (ii) probation; (iii) restitution; (iv) education or training; (v) community services; (vi) loss of student privilege loss of recognition; (viii) hold on transcript and/or registration; (ix) no contact order; (x) trespass from WSU campus; (xi) suspension from residence hall; (xii) removal from residence hall; (xiii) withholding degree; (xiv) revocation of admission and/or degree; (xv) university suspension; (xvi) university expulsion or (xvii) any combination of the previously stated disciplinary sanctions.

Student Disciplinary Procedures in Matters Involving Discrimination and Sexual Violence

The Office of Civil Rights Compliance and Investigation (CRCI) will determine whether the WSU Policy Prohibiting Discrimination Sexual Harassment, and Sexual Misconduct, Executive Policy #15 (EP 15) is implicated. The Center for Community Standards (CCS) will determine whether or not provisions of the WSU Standards of Conduct for Students (Standards of Conduct) are implicated. The reporting party may determine the extent to which they will participate in this process. In some situations, the University may be required to proceed with an investigation regardless of whether the reporting party decides to participate in the investigation or disciplinary process. During an investigation, CRCI will interview witnesses and gather any documentary or other evidence, as provided by the individuals involved in the matter.

At the conclusion of the investigation, CRCI will send an investigative report to CCS and relevant parties. The report will include a summary of the investigation, findings of fact, and a conclusion as to whether or not EP 15 has been violated. In matters involving student conduct, the Center for Community Standards will determine whether disciplinary action under the Standards of Conduct is warranted. In matters that could result in suspension of greater than ten instructional days, revocation of degree, expulsion, or loss of recognition (for student organizations) and disciplinary action is appropriate, the matter will be referred to a full adjudicatory hearing before the University Conduct Board. The University Conduct Board is presided over by an Administrative Law Judge. All relevant parties are notified of their rights during the hearing, the issues to be determine during the hearing, and any relevant dates, times, and locations. For more information about the University Conduct Board process, please visit apps.leg.wa.gov/WAC/default.aspx?cite=504-26-403.

In some circumstances, the Center for Community Standards may address the matter through a less formal one-to-one conduct officer hearing. The Conduct Officer will make a decision on the matter within ten calendar days of the hearing and will notify all involved parties of the decision and their right to appeal to the University Appeals Board. Conduct Officers may issue educational sanctions including those listed in WAC 504-26-425, but not suspension of greater than ten instructional days, expulsion, revocation of degree, or loss of recognition (for student organizations). For additional information on the community standards process, visit communitystandards.wsu.edu or handbook.wsu.edu.

In matters where CRCI does not find a violation of EP 15, and the Complainant(s) or Respondent(s) object to the findings or outcome reflected in the CRCI report, feel there is additional information that should be considered, or feel that student conduct charges are otherwise warranted in the matter, they have the opportunity to provide that information in writing to the Center for Community Standards within ten calendar days of the notification from the Center for Community Standards. The Center for Community Standards will consider this information in determining whether to proceed with a conduct process. If the Complainant(s) or Respondent(s) presents information to the Center for Community Standards that is not reflected in the CRCI report, the Center for Community Standards may elect to refer the matter back to the CRCI to review for a potential revision to CRCI report prior to proceeding with the conduct process.

Additional information on a CRCI investigation, procedural guidelines, and the appeal process is available at crci.wsu.edu/oeo-procedural-guidelines-2/. Information on the Standards of Conduct for students is available at handbook.wsu.edu.

Center for Community Standards

The Center for Community Standards is committed to providing experiences for Cougs which help them succeed. All students are expected to contribute to a safe, healthy and inclusive campus. The Center for Community Standards is here to help guide and correct behaviors which may not align with our community values. The Center for Community Standards challenges students to make better choices with opportunities for educational and personal development, and accountability. Every situation is different, so please contact the Center for Community Standards at 509-335-4532 or visit communitystandards.wsu.edu or handbook.wsu.edu for additional information.

Employee Disciplinary Procedures in Matters Involving Discrimination and Sexual Violence

The Office of Civil Rights Compliance and Investigation (CRCI) will determine whether the Policy Prohibiting Discrimination, Sexual Harassment, and Sexual Misconduct, Executive Policy #15 (EP 15) is implicated. Human Resource Services (HRS) will determine whether any other university policies may be implicated. In some situations, WSU may be required to proceed with an investigation regardless of whether the reporting party decides to participate in the investigation or disciplinary process. During an investigation, CRCI will interview witnesses and gather any documentary or other evidence, as provided by the individuals involved in the matter.

At the conclusion of the investigation, CRCI will send a report to HRS, relevant supervisors, and relevant parties. The report will include a summary of the investigation, findings of fact, and a conclusion as to whether or not EP 15 has been violated.

After CRCI issues a final report, the Complainant(s) or Respondent(s) may file for an appeal, in writing, with WSU Office of the President within fifteen (15) calendar days of the date of issuance. The WSU President has a standing CRCI Appeals Committee (the Committee), which consists of a committee chair, two regular committee members, and two alternate committee members. Committee members receive appropriate training, as determined by CRCI, prior to serving on the committee and at least annually thereafter that is related to the nature of cases that they may review, including discrimination and sexual violence.

During the review of an appeal, the chair of the Committee will conduct an initial review of the appeal, determine whether it met the minimum requirements of the appeals process, and if so, the chair will convene the Committee and send notice to the Complainant(s), Respondent(s), and CRCI within seven (7) calendar days of receiving the appeal. After reviewing the appeal, the Committee will issue a decision letter within thirty (30) calendar days, unless good cause for an extension of up to thirty (30) days is necessary. The Committee’s decision is final with respect to the CRCI investigation, unless the Committee determines that additional investigation by CRCI is warranted. If the Committee concludes that additional investigation is warranted, at the conclusion of such additional investigation, no further appeal is available.

Additional information on a CRCI investigation, procedural guidelines and the appeal process is available at crci.wsu.edu/oeo-procedural-guidelines-2/.

Additional Rights and Process During an Investigation

During an investigation, both students and employees, recognized as Reporting Parties and Responding Parties are provided the following set of rights:

  • Prompt, fair, and impartial process
  • Accompaniment of support person or advisor of own choosing or retaining legal representation (at personal expenses)
  • Proof by Preponderance of the Evidence (more likely than not)
  • Simultaneous notification of outcomes and of hearing schedule
  • Rights to attend hearing(s)
  • Appeal rights
  • Individualized and appropriate interim measures for participants
  • Prohibition on retaliation for all participants

For more information about student rights in the community standards process, please visit handbook.wsu.edu/your-rights-and-responsibilities/.

Section 13 | Definitions of Offenses

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WSU uses the following definitions for the purposes of counting and disclosing criminal offenses, hate crimes, arrests, and disciplinary referral statistics as listed in Section 26.

Definitions Contained in the Clery Act

The Clery Act defines sexual assault into four separate categories: rape, fondling, incest and statutory rape.

  • Rape: The penetration, no matter how slight, of the vagina or anus with any body part or object, or oral penetration by a sex organ of another person, without the consent of the victim, including instances in which the victim is incapable of giving consent.
  • Fondling: The touching of the private body parts of another person for the purpose of sexual gratification, without the consent of the victim, including instances where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of his/her age or because of his/her temporary or permanent mental incapacity.
  • Incest: Sexual intercourse between persons who are related to each other within the degrees wherein marriage is prohibited by law.
  • Statutory Rape: Sexual intercourse with a person who is under the statutory age of consent.

The following crimes are defined in the Clery Act, using the definitions from the Summary Reporting System (SRS) User Manual From the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program:

  • Arson: Any willful or malicious burning or attempt to burn, with or without intent to defraud, a dwelling house, public building, motor vehicle or aircraft, personal property of another, etc.
  • Criminal homicide – Manslaughter by negligence: The killing of another person through gross negligence.
  • Criminal homicide – Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter: The willful (nonnegligent) killing of one human being by another.
  • Robbery: The taking or attempting to take anything of value from the care, custody, or control of a person or persons by force or threat of force or violence and/or by putting the victim in fear.
  • Aggravated assault: An unlawful attack by one person upon another for the purpose of inflicting severe or aggravated bodily injury. This type of assault usually is accompanied by the use of a weapon or by means likely to produce death or great bodily harm.
  • Burglary: The unlawful entry of a structure to commit a felony or a theft. This includes unlawful entry with intent to commit a larceny or felony; housebreaking; safecracking; and all attempts to commit any of the aforementioned.
  • Motor vehicle theft: The theft or attempted theft of a motor vehicle.
  • Weapons: Carrying, Possessing, Etc.: The violation of laws or ordinances prohibiting the manufacture, sale, purchase, transportation, possession, concealment, or use of firearms, cutting instruments, explosives, incendiary devices, or other deadly weapons.
  • Drug Abuse Violations: The violation of laws prohibiting the production, distribution, and/or use of certain controlled substances and the equipment or devices utilized in their preparation and/or use. The unlawful cultivation, manufacture, distribution, sale, purchase, use, possession, transportation, or importation of any controlled drug or narcotic substance. Arrests for violations of State and local laws, specifically those relating to the unlawful possession, sale, use, growing, manufacturing, and making of narcotic drugs.
  • Liquor Law Violations: The violation of State or local laws or ordinances prohibiting the manufacture, sale, purchase, transportation, possession, or use of alcoholic beverages, not including driving under the influence and drunkenness.

The Clery Act Also defines Hate Crimes as any of the above-mentioned offenses, as well as any of the below listed offenses, where the offense was motivated by bias:

  • Larceny-Theft (Except for Motor Vehicle Theft): The unlawful taking, carrying, leading, or riding away of property from the possession or constructive possession of another. Attempted larcenies are included. Embezzlement, confidence games, forgery, worthless checks, etc., are excluded.
  • Simple Assault: An unlawful physical attack by one person upon another where neither the offender displays a weapon, nor the victim suffers obvious severe or aggravated bodily injury involving apparent broken bones, loss of teeth, possible internal injury, severe laceration, or loss of consciousness.
  • Intimidation: To unlawfully place another person in reasonable fear of bodily harm through the use of threatening words and/or other conduct, but without displaying a weapon or subjecting the victim to actual physical attack.
  • Destruction/Damage/Vandalism of Property: To willfully or maliciously destroy, damage, deface, or otherwise injure real or personal property without the consent of the owner or the person having custody or control of it.

Definitions Contained in the Violence Against Women Act

  • Sexual Assault: An offense that meets the definition of rape, fondling, incest, or statutory rape, as used in the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) program. Per the National Incident-Based Reporting System User Manual from the FBI UCR program, a sex offense is “any sexual act directed against another person, without the consent of the victim, including instances where the victim is incapable of giving consent.”
  • Domestic violence:A felony or misdemeanor crime of violence committed

    • By a current or former spouse or intimate partner of the victim.
    • By a person with whom the victim shares a child in common.
    • By a person who is cohabitating with or has cohabitated with the victim as a spouse of intimate partner.
    • By a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred.
    • By any other person against an adult of youth victim who is protected from that person’s acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred.
  • Dating violence: Violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate relationship with the victim.

    • The existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on the reporting party’s statement and with consideration of the length of the relationship, the type of relationship, and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship.
    • For the purposes of this definition, dating violence includes but is not limited to sexual of physical abuse or the threat of such abuse and does not include acts covered under the definition of domestic violence.
  • Stalking: Engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to:
    • Fear for the person’s safety or the safety of others; or
    • Suffer substantial emotional distress.
  • Washington state law definitions of these crimes differ and are incorporated into the Revised Code of Washington available online at apps.leg.wa.gov/rcw/.

Definitions Contained Within The WSU Policy Prohibiting Discrimination, Sexual Harassment, Sexual Misconduct, Executive Policy #15 (EP 15)

Executive Policy #15 (EP 15), the WSU Policy Prohibiting Discrimination, Sexual Harassment, Sexual Misconduct, prohibits sexual harassment including sexual misconduct and other forms of sex and gender based violence as defined below. WSU will address student allegations of sex and gender based violence regardless of where the conduct occurred.

  • CONSENT

    Consent to any sexual activity must be clear, knowing, and voluntary. Anything less is equivalent to a “no.” Clear, knowing, and voluntary consent to sexual activity requires that, at the time of the act, and throughout the sexual contact, all parties actively express words or conduct that a reasonable person would conclude demonstrates clear permission regarding willingness to engage in sexual activity and the conditions of such activity. Consent is active; silence or passivity is not consent. Even if words or conduct alone seem to imply consent, sexual activity is non-consensual when:

    • Force or coercion is threatened or used to procure compliance with the sexual activity;
      • Force is the use of physical violence, physical force, threat, or intimidation to overcome resistance or gain consent to sexual activity;
      • Coercion is unreasonable pressure for sexual activity. When an individual makes it clear through words or actions that the individual does not want to engage in sexual contact, wants to stop, or does not want to go past a certain point of sexual interaction, continued pressure beyond that point may be coercive. Other examples of coercion may include using blackmail or extortion to overcome resistance or gain consent to sexual activity;
    • The person is asleep, unconscious, or physically unable to communicate their unwillingness to engage in sexual activity; or
    • A reasonable person would or should know that the other person lacks the mental capacity at the time of the sexual activity to be able to understand the nature or consequences of the act, whether that incapacity is produced by illness, defect, the influence of alcohol or another substance, or some other cause. When alcohol or drugs are involved, a person is considered incapacitated or unable to give valid consent if the individual cannot fully understand the details of the sexual interaction (i.e., who, what, when, where, why, and how), and/or the individual lacks the capacity to reasonably understand the situation and to make rational, reasonable decisions.
  • SEXUAL MISCONDUCT

    Sexual misconduct is an egregious form of sex discrimination/sexual harassment. A number of acts may be regarded as sexual misconduct including, but not limited to, non-consensual sexual contact (including sexual intercourse) and sexual exploitation. Sexual misconduct includes sexual assault and other sexual violence. (WAC 504-26- 221(1))

  • NON-CONSENSUAL SEXUAL CONTACT

    Non-consensual sexual contact is any intentional sexual touching, however slight, with any object or body part, by one person against another person’s intimate parts (or clothing covering any of those areas), or by causing another person to touch his or her own or another person’s intimate body parts without consent and/or by force. Sexual contact also can include any intentional bodily contact in a sexual manner with another person’s non-intimate body parts. It also includes non-consensual sexual intercourse. (WAC 504-26-221(3))

  • SEXUAL EXPLOITATION

    Sexual exploitation occurs when a person takes non-consensual or abusive sexual advantage of another for his/her own advantage or benefit, or to benefit or advantage anyone other than the one being exploited, and that behavior does not otherwise constitute one of the other sexual misconduct offenses. Examples of sexual exploitation may include, but are limited to (WAC 504-26-221):

    • Causing or attempting to cause the incapacitation of another person to gain sexual advantage over such other person;
    • Invading another person’s sexual privacy;
    • Prostituting another person;
    • Engaging in voyeurism. A person commits voyeurism if, for the purpose of arousing or gratifying the sexual desires of any person, he or she knowingly views, photographs, records, or films another person, without that person’s knowledge and consent, while the person being viewed, photographed, recorded, or filmed is in a place where he or she has a reasonable expectation of privacy;
    • Knowingly or recklessly exposing another person to a significant risk of sexually transmitted disease or infection;
    • Exposing one’s intimate parts in nonconsensual circumstances;
    • Sexually based stalking and/or bullying.
  • STALKING

    Stalking is engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to (WAC 504-26-223):

    • Fear for his or her safety or the safety of others;
    • Fear for harm to his or her property or the property of others; or
    • Suffer substantial emotional distress.
    • Stalking includes, but is not limited to, conduct occurring in person, electronically, or through a third party.
  • INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE

    Intimate partner violence includes violence or abusive behavior within an intimate partner relationship. Intimate partner violence may also be referred to as domestic violence or dating violence. It can be physical, sexual, emotional, verbal, economic, or psychological in nature and can include actions or threats of actions that influence or harm an intimate partner (EP 15).

 


Section 14 | Other Policies and Procedures

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SEX OFFENDER REGISTRATION – CAMPUS SEX CRIMES PREVENTION ACT

The Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act of 2000 requires colleges and universities to inform students and employees how to learn the identity of registered sex offenders on campus. This law also requires that sex offenders provide notice to any institution of higher education at which the person is employed or is a student. You can obtain information regarding registered sexual offenders by contacting the Whitman County Sheriff’s Office, Records Department, located at N. 411 Mill, Colfax, Washington, 509-397-6266.

WASHINGTON CRIME VICTIM’S COMPENSATION ACT

The Washington State Crime Victim’s Compensation Program provides financial compensation to crime victims for expenses including medical bills and loss of financial support. Washington state law (RCW 7.68.170) requires the Crime Victims Compensation Program to pay the costs of sexual assault examinations when they are performed to gather evidence for possible prosecution. The victim is not required to pay for the exam, use their own insurance, file a police report, or crime victim’s application to have the exam covered.

WASHINGTON ADMINISTRATIVE CODE: STANDARDS OF CONDUCT FOR STUDENTS

All students are expected to follow the behavior expectations for our community as outlined in WAC 504-26. If a potential violation of the community expectations is reported, the Center for Community Standards (CCS) is responsible for investigating the alleged violation except in matters where the reported conduct implicated Executive Policy #15 in which case the Office of Civil Rights Compliance and Investigation (CRCI) is responsible for investigating the alleged violation prior to referring the matter to CCS. At the conclusion of an investigation, the appropriate office, either CRCI or CCS, will make a finding of responsibility, and assign restorative and educational sanctions as appropriate.

WEAPONS POLICY

The WSU Standards of Conduct for Students, WAC 504-26-213, prohibits students from carrying, possessing or using any firearm, explosive (including fireworks), dangerous chemicals, or any dangerous weapon on university property or in university approved housing. Additionally, airsoft guns and any other item that appears to be a firearm, or any item that shoots projectiles are prohibited in WSU housing.
Information on the student housing contracts may be found here.

MISSING STUDENT NOTIFICATION POLICY AND PROCEDURES

WSU takes the well-being of students seriously and the university has processes in place when a student is missing. If anyone has reason to believe that a WSU student is missing, they should immediately call 911 and report the concern. Callers outside the Pullman area should call WHITCOM at 509-332-2521. Should the student reside on campus, the WSU staff in on-campus housing are instructed, per the Residence Life Crisis Response Manual, to contact the WSU PD if they believe a student is missing or reported by others to be missing.

POLICY REGARDING CONTACT PERSONS

All students residing in on-campus housing, regardless of age, may identify one or more individuals to be a contact strictly for missing persons purposes. The contact person(s) will be contacted by the university not later than 24 hours after the time that the student is determined missing by WSU PD. Students are encouraged to provide contact information on their MyWSU account at incoming mandatory orientation. Students can update the contact(s) by accessing their MyWSU account. The information provided will only be accessible to authorized campus offices and to law enforcement in in case of emergency, which may include a missing person investigation.

WSU PD makes the determination as to whether the student is considered to be missing. Consistent with the Clery Act, within 24 hours of a determination that a student residing in on-campus housing is missing, WSU PD will transmit a report for inclusion within the Washington Crime Information Center (WACIC) and the National Crime Information Center (NCIC) databases. The information is also relayed to other local and surrounding law enforcement agencies. Additionally, if the missing student is under the age of 18 and not emancipated, WSU will notify the student’s parent or legal guardian and any other contact person(s) designated by the student within 24 hours after WSU PD has determined the student is missing.
 


Section 15 | Drug and Alcohol Policies

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WSU POLICIES GOVERNING ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUGS

WSU by Executive Policy #20 aims to eliminate alcohol and drug abuse and to educate the University community on relevant laws and consequences. This policy provides consistency and clarity on the permitted use and enforcement of alcohol laws and statutes on all WSU properties statewide. WSU’s policy prohibits the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs or alcohol on University-controlled property.

Executive Policy #20 can be found at public.wsu.edu/~forms/HTML/EPM/EP20_Alcohol_and_Drug_Policy.htm.
Additionally, Washington state law, RCW Chapter 70.160, prohibits smoking in any WSU owned, leased, rented public place or place of employment. The WSU Pullman, WSU Spokane, WSU Tri-Cities, and WSU Vancouver campuses each restrict tobacco and nicotine use on campus, with the exception to tobacco cessation programs or approved research.
Refer to Safety Policies and Procedures Manual (SPPM) 6.10 and resources at hrs.wsu.edu/tobacco-nicotine-free.
Employees who violate Executive Policy #20 or SPPM 6.10 may be subject to corrective or disciplinary actions.

POLICIES SPECIFIC TO WSU STUDENTS

WSU complies with the Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988. This program provides educational and training programs and prohibits the use of controlled substances in the workplace. In addition, WSU has developed programs to prevent the unlawful possession, use, and/or distribution of illegal drugs and alcohol by employees and students. Any employee who violates the WSU Alcohol and Drug Policy, Executive Policy #20, may be subject to corrective action by the university, in addition to any penalties resulting from violating local, state and/or federal law. Sanctions for illegal use of drugs and/or alcohol in the workplace may include, but are not limited to, recommendations for completion of an appropriate rehabilitation program, written or verbal warning, censure, dismissal, and, in emergency situations, immediate suspension. Additional information on the policy can be found at public.wsu.edu/~forms/HTML/EPM/EP20_Alcohol_and_Drug_Policy.htm. Additionally, Washington state law (RCW Chapter 70.160) prohibits smoking in any University owned, leased, or rented public place or place of employment.

Policies Specific to WSU Students

The WSU PD and local police enforce all Washington state laws pertaining to drugs and alcohol, and students may also be subject to sanctions through the Center for Community Standards (CCS). CCS will follow procedures outlined in the Standards of Conduct for Students (Standards of Conduct), WAC 504-26, if a violation is reported.

UNIVERSITY’S EXPECTATION FOR USE OF ALCOHOL

The legal age for individuals to consume alcohol in the state of Washington is 21. Those not of legal age who consume alcohol will be in violation of the Standards of Conduct and WSU’s Alcohol and Drug Policy. Students of legal age who choose to drink alcoholic beverages are expected to do so responsibly and according to the policies and regulations of their living environment (i.e., residence halls, fraternity and sorority chapter-owned facilities, campus apartments, etc.).

Students may not:

  • Distribute and/or sell alcohol to anyone under the age of 21.
  • Drink or possess alcohol if under the age of 21.
  • Drink or possess alcohol regardless of age if alcohol is prohibited at the location.
  • Possess, use, manufacture, distribute and/or sell drugs (marijuana, narcotics, or other controlled substance) and drug paraphernalia (pipes, bongs, scales, cigarette papers, etc.).
  • Drink alcohol at a sponsored event on any University property without an alcohol license or banquet permit.
  • Overconsume alcohol or be intoxicated in public.

If students are under the age of 21 or are in a location that prohibits all alcohol or drugs (including residence hall rooms, shared areas in residence halls, fraternity and sorority chapter-owned facilities that are alcohol-free), leave the area immediately. Any person who is in the room while alcohol and/or drugs are present may be in violation of the Standards of Conduct and/or the law. Even if you just walked in the room, the alcohol and/or drugs isn’t yours, you did not drink any alcohol or use any drugs and/or you are completely sober, you may still be responsible for violating University Policy.
Students must comply with “no alcohol” policies if established for floors within residence halls, living groups, and/or designated residence halls.

Students are accountable to the Standards of Conduct from the time of application for admission through the actual awarding of a degree. The Standards of Conduct apply to on campus and online behavior and some off-campus behavior. For more information about jurisdiction, please visit https://apps.leg.wa.gov/WAC/default.aspx?cite=504-26-015.
For additional information regarding WSU’s alcohol and drug policy, please visit communitystandards.wsu.edu.

MEDICAL AND RECREATIONAL CANNABIS

In accordance with the federal Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989, WSU strictly prohibits the use, possession, manufacture, or distribution and/or sale of cannabis and other controlled substances anywhere on campus it is a violation of the Standards of Conduct, as well as University Housing Policy, for students to use, possess, manufacture, distribute and/or sell cannabis while on University property, even if the student is over the age of 21 and/or procured the cannabis through legal means.

Additionally, WSU prohibits the use of medical cannabis on campus, including all residence halls and WSU apartments. Cannabis obtained for medicinal purposes cannot be stored or used in the residence halls or WSU apartments. The use and/or storage of all drug paraphernalia is also prohibited in the residence halls and WSU apartments. All questions regarding the reasonable accommodation of medical conditions, including conditions treated with medical cannabis, should be directed to the WSU Access Center by calling 509-335-3417.

 


Section 16 | Counseling Services and Outreach Education

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COUGAR HEALTH SERVICES INCLUDING COUNSELING AND PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES (CAPS), HEALTH PROMOTION, AND THE MEDICAL CLINIC PROVIDE SERVICES TO THE WSU CAMPUS

WSU Cougar Health Services (CHS) offers a range of services related to substance abuse including 1:1 counseling, assessment, therapy groups, workshops and outreach programs, online confidential and personalized feedback, and consultation to WSU students. These services support personal efforts to maintain health and the reduction of health harms, including substance abuse/disorder, so students can achieve academic, career, and personal success. The foundation of CHS programs is built on best practice recommended for substance abuse in a university setting in the College Alcohol Intervention Matrix.

Additionally, CHS substance abuse programs are in compliance with the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act (DFSCA). DFSCA report available upon request. Select programs and targeted services are described below.

CLINICAL TREATMENT

CAPS utilizes a generalist model of alcohol and other drug (AOD) treatment, whereby all psychologists, staff psychological residents, psychology interns, and practicum students may be referred clients with AOD issues, as AOD issues are often co-morbid with other psychological disorders. All psychologists, staff psychological residents, and psychology interns are able to work with AOD issues. As these clinicians supervise practicum students, any AOD issues that arise within the trainees’ caseloads are addressed in supervision. Additionally, a supervised AOD rotation is available for doctoral interns and other trainees. Generally, clinical services are based on student need and voluntary participation.

These include:

  • Alcohol and other drug use screening at intake and addressed within 1:1 sessions.
  • Follow-up for WSU students following AOD-related hospitalization, in conjunction with Pullman Regional Hospital.
  • Ongoing workshops/groups provided in CAPS integrate AOD use/abuse into discussion and intervention.
  • Referral to community based services and resources.

PSYCHOLOGICAL EDUCATION AND HARM REDUCTION OUTREACH

Booze, Sex, and Reality Checks (BSRC): BSRC is a mandatory program for all incoming first year and transfer students to address transition from home to campus life and focuses on academic success, substance use, sexual decision making, and consent. There are two mandatory requirements needed to complete the BSRC program: the in-person workshop and the online survey with personalized feedback (e-CHUG). e-CHUG is an online, confidential survey that allows students to receive personalized feedback about the impacts of alcohol and other drug use. First year and incoming transfer students under the age of 21 are required to complete this online survey; however, it is an open access survey available to all students. Information on e-CHUG is available at https://cougarhealth.wsu.edu/echug/.

CULTURALLY-BASED SERVICES:

Multicultural Student Services (MSS) outreach: Health Promotion facilitates culturally-based outreaches and liaison services focused on long-term relationships with student groups primarily located in MSS. The effective practice of psycho-education and harm reduction in higher education requires culturally competent facilitation in outreach and education efforts in order to advance the health of all individual students and the university community at large. This includes the design of outreach, which reflects the social, political, and economic diversity of the student body and cultural environments. Health Promotions’ efforts towards culturally competent outreach includes the application of empirically-based strategies in conjunction with culturally-focused strategies. This comprehensive program utilizes a peer/professional model, identity concordance and the use of various education modalities with motivational interviewing.

REGISTERED STUDENT ORGANIZATION (RSO) EVENT TRAINING:

As per WSU policy on the approval to serve alcoholic beverages and referral by Student Involvement, Health Promotions provides mandatory harm reduction training for RSOs that wish to serve alcohol at events on campus. The discussion and training include a review of the event structure and alcohol service, liability concerns, a pouring demo, and review of standard drink, as well as harm reduction tips for hosts.

FRATERNITY AND SORORITY COMMUNITY AND RESIDENCE HALL OUTREACH

Upon request, Health Promotions offers harm reduction outreach and consultation to Residence Life, individual residence halls, Fraternity and Sorority chapter houses, and the Center for Fraternity and Sorority Life. Topics can include substance use emergency response, blackout and cognitive impact, mixing alcohol and other substances, academic impacts and substance use, sleep and impacts of substance use.

Cougar Health Services Counseling and Psychological Services and Health Promotions provide annual training to Resident Education Directors (REDs) and Residence Advisors (RAs) on the interrelationship between substance use, mental health, and academic success.
Training is available to Fraternity and Sorority leadership upon request and is semi-regularly provided at Fraternity and Sorority leadership meetings. Trainings with the Center for Community Standards staff and student employees is available upon request.

IMPACT

IMPACT is an education service provided to students who are referred by the Center for Community Standards (CCS) for substance use violations. The purpose of this intervention is to administer a substance abuse education program that is focused on harm reduction strategies, motivational interviewing, and brief intervention. The IMPACT classes and 1:1 sessions have been developed to provide an empirically-based intervention to meet the specific needs of students who exhibit high risk substance abuse behaviors. The IMPACT program is unique in that it is not a ‘one size fits all’ intervention; rather, IMPACT is structured to route students, via confidential assessment with personalized feedback, to the intervention that best meets their needs in terms of psycho-education and clinical concerns.

IMPACT Workshops – The Impact II session 1 workshop provides an opportunity for challenging positive and negative expectations of substance use, a corrective standard drink demo or a discussion of intoxication thresholds for cannabis use, harm reduction and protective strategies and skill, and information on the impacts of substance use on sleep and academics.

After the completion of the first class participants are directed to online assessment surveys for alcohol, cannabis, poly-substance, and other drug use that assess for substance abuse, genetic and family history addiction criteria, high risk health behaviors (eCHECKUP TO GO). The assessment gives immediate personalized feedback about their alcohol and/or drug use. After completing the assessment, students a directed to go to the Impact II session 2 class (small group intervention, lower to moderate risk indicator or to a 1:1 session with Counseling and Psychological Services staff/faculty, if high-risk indicators for substance abuse/addiction criteria are endorsed.

The Impact 2nd session workshop employs a series of teaching and learning components with motivational interviewing that includes norms clarification, risk reduction and moderation discussion, the role of family history within the process of abuse and addiction, as well as information on blackout, high blood alcohol levels, and cognitive/academic impact of high risk use.

IMPACT 1:1 sessions – Interventions are delivered by Cougar Health Services, Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) faculty, doctoral interns, and other trainees under supervision. All 1:1 sessions (Alcohol, Cannabis, Other Drug, and Polysubstance) are based on motivational interviewing and are focused on evoking students’ intrinsic motivation to change their alcohol or drug use. Prior to the 1: meeting, students complete a series of standardized assessments that, along with the students’ personalized eCHECKUP TO GO feedback, facilitates harm reduction discussion and intervention.

WSU students access the IMPACT program as outlined above. Students receive direction for their routed participation (group or 1:1 sessions and assessment type) in multiple ways: from the Center for Community Standards (CCS), in the IMPACT workshop, and the Health Promotions website. A detailed procedural flow chart and routing logic for 1:1 vs. group the 4 sanction types (alcohol, cannabis, poly-substance, and other drug) as well as the sanction/violation number (1, 2, 3) is available upon request.


Section 17 | Campus Security Policies and Safety Awareness Programs

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The WSU Police Department (WSU PD), in partnership with the campus community strives to cultivate an atmosphere which supports the educational process and promotes academic and personal achievement and community prosperity. Last year, WSU PD provided over 103 educational and prevention driven programs to students, and regularly offers prevention programs, and safety information to students and employees. Additionally, WSU PD assigns one police officer to each residence hall on the WSU Pullman campus who works closely with hall staff to provide general crime prevention and safety programs for the residents.

Although WSU PD takes many steps to educate and maintain safety on campus, each individual within the campus community plays a role and it is important to be aware of surroundings and use reasonable judgement when living, working or visiting campus. Please report suspicious or criminal activities to the WSU PD at 509-335-8548 or 911.

STUDENT CARE (AWARE) NETWORK

The Student Care (AWARE) Network is an online resource that includes a Student Care Reporting Form that allows individuals to share concerns about a student’s emotional or psychological well-being, physical health, or academic performance with university administrators who can help. Anyone can submit a Student Care report including students, faculty, staff, family members, and community members. Information submitted through the AWARE network will be reviewed by the Office of the Dean of Students team for appropriate follow up. The AWARE Network can be accessed at aware.wsu.edu.

STUDENT CARE TEAM

The Student Care Team responds to reports about students who are exhibiting behavior of concern and/or have received a Student Care or other report of a concern for a student. The multi-disciplinary Student Care team intervenes with care and support to protect the safety and well-being of the involved student, as well as the WSU community, by working directly with the student, and /or connecting students with others with appropriate resources and services.

DAILY CRIME AND FIRE LOG

The WSU PD produces and posts a Daily Crime Log of all crimes reported to WSU PD. The log is available 24 hours per day to anyone wishing to access it. The log identifies the type of report, location, and time of each incident reported to the WSU PD. The Daily Crime Log is available online at police.wsu.edu/daily-crimfire-log/ or at WSU PD located at 2201 E. Grimes Way, Pullman, Washington 99164.

The Fire and Safety Compliance Officer maintains a Fire Log of all fire incidents that have occurred in WSU Housing and Residence Life (Residence Life) buildings. The log identifies the type of incident, location, a time of each fire incident in Residence Life buildings. The Fire Log at is available at the Washington State University Police Department located at 2201 E. Grimes Way, Pullman, Washington 99164.


Section 18 | Housing and Fire Safety Report

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In August 2008, the Higher Education Opportunity Act (Public Law 110-315) became law. This act requires all U.S. academic institutions to produce an annual fire safety report outlining fire safety practices, standards, and all fire-related on campus statistics pertaining to on-campus residential buildings.

Pursuant to this act, the following document is a report detailing the fire safety practices, standards, and statistics applicable to the WSU Pullman campus.

UNIVERSITY HOUSING AND RESIDENCE LIFE RESIDENCE HALLS

All of WSU’s operational residence halls have full fire sprinkler systems and automatic fire alarm systems that report to a continuously staffed dispatch center.

CAMPUS APARTMENTS:

The WSU campus in Pullman has nine (9) on-campus apartment complexes for students and their families. Of these nine (9) complexes, three (3) have a full fire sprinkler system and an alarm system that automatically reports to a continuously staffed dispatch center. One (1) of the nine (9) on-campus apartment complexes has a room level alarm system that automatically reports to a continuously staffed dispatch center. All apartment units in all nine (9) complexes have smoke detectors. Most of these smoke detectors are single station detectors that sound a local alarm but do not automatically report to the dispatch center. Two of these apartment complexes have heat detectors in boiler and laundry rooms which automatically report to the dispatch center.

ASSIGNMENT POLICIES

Special room assignments within a living group follow priority systems that are developed by the individual residence hall. General room assignments are made on the basis of contractual deadlines and the order applications and deposits to Washington State University are received. Not meeting such deadlines decreases the likelihood of receiving the room of choice. Housing Services reserves the right to reassign individuals to different areas, rooms, residences, and dining centers, at any time (and the right use unassigned space in the residence halls). If a vacancy occurs in any room, the remaining resident(s) will be required to choose from one of the following options:

  • If another roommate is available, the remaining resident(s) can accept a roommate assigned by Housing Services. The remaining resident(s) must keep the room ready for additional occupancy at any time.
  • If the remaining resident(s) refuse to accept a roommate assigned by Housing Services, the remaining resident(s) will pay pro-rated charges at an increased rate established by Housing Services from the date the vacancy occurred until the date any new roommate moves into the room; transfer to another room assigned by Housing Services; or, subject to availability, remain in the room and pay an increased rate established by Housing Services.

Changing rooms is prohibited until the Residential Education Director has granted permission. Room change requests will not normally be accepted during the last fifteen (15) calendar days of each semester. Spring semester transfers must be completed before departing campus the end of Fall semester. Storage of belongings during semester break may be required.

GUESTS

Except for Washington State University staff who have access to residence halls at all times while in the performance of their assigned duties, guests are defined as any individuals who are not contracted residents of the specific room or hall in question. Each guest must have a host and be escorted within the building. Guests are permitted in the halls according to each hall’s visitation policy. Guests must abide by all policies of the University and residence halls. Hosts are responsible and will be held accountable for the conduct of their guests. Due to fire codes, no more than ten (10) persons are allowed in a student room any time. Overnight guests may stay in the room of the host for a maximum of three consecutive nights with the approval of the roommate(s) if applicable. Note: Washington State University reserves the right to withdraw the privilege of any resident to grant permission to anyone to enter the premises of any residence hall.

MEASURES TO SECURE ENTRANCES TO STUDENT HOUSING FACILITIES

The maintenance of a safe and secure residence hall environment is everyone’s responsibility. To this end, the admittance of unauthorized persons to residence halls is prohibited. Residents should always lock their room doors to ensure personal safety and security of their property. For emergency situations requiring police, medical or firefight response, dial 911. For nonemergency assistance, call the WSU PD at 335-8548. Living areas of all residence halls are locked 24 hours per day, with the exception of McEachern hall, which has some rooms with direct access.


Section 19 | Residence Hall Fire and Safety Regulations

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RESIDENCE HALL EVACUATION LOCATIONS

Community Duncan Dunn

  • Primary
    • Across the street near McCroskey Hall in the open grass area;
    • Across the street from the front of the building in the Green 4 parking lot.
  • Secondary
    • Wilmer and Davis Main Lobbies

Gannon-Goldsworthy

  • Primary
    • Across the sky bridge in front of the Neil and Shock Physics buildings;
    • On the west McEachern walkway above the Southside Dining Center;
    • In the Kruegel (Green 2) parking lot
  • Secondary
    • Stephenson Down Under

Global Scholars

  • Primary
    • Across the street in the Smith Gym parking lot
  • Secondary
    • Northside Lobby

Honors

  • Primary
    • Across the street (Spokane St.) in front of Honors
  • Secondary
    • McCroskey Lobby

McCroskey

  • Primary
    • The south lawn, across the sidewalk, between McCroskey and Thompson
  • Secondary
    • Honors 4th floor lounge

McEachern

  • Primary
    • The Rogers-Orton playfield
  • Secondary
    • Orton Lobby/12th floor

Northside

  • Primary
    • Around the fire pit and Flag Lane/bus parking area by the track
  • Secondary
    • Regents Lobby/Sky Lounge

Olympia

  • Primary
    • The Rogers-Orton playfield
  • Secondary
    • McEachern Lobby

Orton

  • Primary
    • The Rogers-Orton playfield
  • Secondary
    • McEachern Lobby

Regents

  • Primary
    • Across Colorado Street in front of Bohler Gym
  • Secondary
    • Coman Lobby/Lounge

Rogers

  • Primary
    • The Green 2 parking lot near Kruegel Hall
  • Secondary
    • Orton Lobby/12th floor

Scott-Coman

  • Primary
    • The Crimson lot in front of Regents, next to Northside Hall
  • Secondary
    • Regents Lobby/Sky Lounge

Stephenson East

  • Primary
    • End of the lowest Crimson 2 parking lot of the hall
  • Secondary
    • Rogers Lobby/12th floor

Stephenson North

  • Primary
    • The Kruegel Hall (Green 2) parking lot across the street
  • Secondary
    • Rogers Lobby/12th floor

Stephenson South

  • Primary
    • The lower Crimson 2 parking lot behind the building
  • Secondary
    • Rogers Lobby/12th floor

Stephenson Complex

  • Primary
    • Individual Buildings locations
  • Secondary
    • Rogers lobby with overflow into the Gannon-Goldsworthy Lobby

Stevens

  • Primary
    • The sidewalk in front of the building
  • Secondary
    • Wilmer Lounge

Stimson

  • Primary
    • Waller basketball court and lower lot
  • Secondary
    • Waller Lobby

Streit Perham

  • Primary
    • On Flag Lane near the fire pit
  • Secondary
    • Regents Lobby/Sky Lounge

Waller

  • Primary
    • Stimson basketball court and lot
  • Secondary
    • Stimson Lobby

Wilmer-Davis

  • Primary
    • Green 4 parking lot north of Davis
    • The Green 4 parking lot north of Chinook
    • Stevens Lawn
  • Secondary
    • Stevens Lobby

FIRE DRILLS FOR RESIDENCE HALLS:

All University Residence Halls are required by the fire code to have four fire drills annually, which include at least one night time drill. Academic buildings receive fire drills periodically based on hazard assessment, accreditation requirements, and safety committee recommendations.

FIRE SAFETY IN UNIVERSITY HOUSING:

The following is the list of room regulations every resident must follow. The list is posted in every residence hall room.

  • Smoke detectors are located in all residence hall sleeping rooms as a source of early warning in case of fire. To ensure it is working properly, test your smoke detector monthly. Smoke detectors can be tested by pushing the test button on the bottom of the detector. If a loud shrill alarm is produced by the detector, it is working properly. If the detector fails to sound an alarm or if it emits a short beep intermittently, the battery in the detectors must be replaced. Remove the battery from the detector and take it to the hall information desk for a replacement battery, free of charge.
  • All extension cords must be three-wire, three-prong type, and must be constructed with a minimum of 16-gauge wire. (Gauge numbers vary inversely with capacity.) Cords must be well-maintained with no breaks in the insulation.
  • Light-construction, multiple-outlet devices (cube taps) that plug directly into outlets are not authorized. Heavy duty, multiple outlet devices equipped with internal breaker protection, three-wire, three-prong ground protection, and 16-gauge or heavier wires are authorized. Authorized extension cords may be equipped with multiple outlets, as long as the outlet fitting is a single-piece, fused-rubber type that is an integral component of the extension cord.
  • Not more than one high-wattage appliance such as a hair dryer, water warmer, etc., may be connected to a single wall outlet at one time.
  • All appliances must be sufficiently protected from shock hazards and must be maintained in good repair with no insulation damage or exposed wires.
  • Electrical cooking equipment such as fry pans, toasters, hot oil popcorn poppers, hot plates, personal microwaves, etc., are not authorized for use in student rooms. Well-maintained hot air popcorn poppers, coffee pots, bread making machines, and water warmers are allowed only if they are placed on a non-combustible surface such as ceramic or insulated metal.
  • Electrical cords must not be crushed, compressed, constricted, or coiled in a manner that may cause breakdown of insulation, cause heat, or cause an induced current to appear in adjacent metal objects. Modification of electrical wiring is not permitted. Electrical cords shall not run through walls, ceilings, floors, doorways or windows, or across exits.
  • Under certain circumstances (heating is inadequate, nonexistent, or temporarily out of order), portable heaters are authorized in residence halls. For guidance on authorized models see the Safety Policies and Procedures Manual, Policy 8.50. (policies.wsu.edu/prf/index/manuals/8-00-fire-safety/8-50-space-heaters/).
  • Draperies, tapestries, blankets, or posters that are displayed on walls and doors in a manner which would facilitate ignition, block exits or fire detection units, or present overhead fire hazards are not authorized.
  • Student-constructed furniture, posters, papers, and combustible decorations may not be present in sufficient amounts to constitute an excessive combustible fire load, nor can fire safety devices be obstructed.
  • Decisions concerning fire load violations will be rendered in accordance with the judgment of the inspector and the following inspection guidelines:
    • Combustible wall paneling is prohibited.
    • Not more than 50% of room wall space may be covered with combustible decorations.
    • Full floor carpeting is allowed only on the original floor.
    • Anything that hinders quick exit from a room (e.g. messy room, furniture, etc.) is prohibited and must be corrected.
    • Life safety signs on the inside of each residence room door shall be visible at all times. If the placard has been torn or defected, a new placard shall be obtained from Housing Services and placed over the existing placard.
    • Decorations must be non-combustible or flame proofed. Paper and streamers attached to ceilings are not allowed. All decorations must be removed no later than three days following a holiday; Christmas/Chanukah/ Kwanzaa/Ramadan decorations must be removed before semester break. Christmas trees and decorations are prohibited in hallways and elevator rooms. Small, fresh Christmas trees are permitted and must be placed in water. The base of the tree must be removed with an angled cut, at least one inch above the original cut. Trees must be well-supported, away from all sources of heat and ignition. Decorative lighting must be well maintained and bear the “UL” label. Lights must be unplugged when unattended.
    • Decorations in hallways are limited to room doors.
  • Any explosives, including but not limited to, primers, powder, dynamite caps, firecrackers, and pyrotechnics, as well as ammunition and dangerous chemicals, are prohibited in the residence halls. Toy guns and “assassin” games, the purpose of which is to simulate killing others, are prohibited.

 


Section 20 | University Fire Safety Guidelines

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Individuals found in violation of safety regulations will be cited and given the opportunity to correct the problem. Failure to comply with safety regulations will result in disciplinary action and/or a fine.

SMOKING:

No smoking is permitted on the WSU Pullman campus including buildings, residence halls, and apartments. WSU Pullman’s campus policy in Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 504-38 prohibits all forms of tobacco and any nicotine-delivery devices, including electronic cigarettes, in or on WSU Pullman campus grounds and state owned vehicles and equipment. This includes non-contiguous WSU-owned property located within the city limits of Pullman, WA and within Whitman County.

WSU employees, students and visitors are responsible for complying with Washington state law (RCW Chapter 70.160, Clean Indoor Air Act) and any applicable campus tobacco and nicotine use policy, referenced above.

FIRE INSPECTIONS:

The WSU Pullman campus has a Fire and Safety Compliance Officer assigned to plan reviews, fire code enforcement, fire inspections, and fire safety training. The public areas (hallways, corridors, meeting rooms, etc.) of residence halls are inspected once each semester. Academic buildings are inspected periodically based on hazard classification and time availability. Academic departments have active safety committees that also conduct general safety inspections and report perceived fire safety problems to the Fire and Safety Compliance Officer for resolution.

Compliance with residence hall fire and safety standards is required. All residence hall rooms are subject to national, state, and Washington State University fire codes and standards. Failure to comply with safety standards may result in student conduct sanctions, early contract termination, and/or legal action.

Property damage and personal injury resulting from a resident’s noncompliance with fire and safety standards may result in personal liability for damages and injuries. Residents are responsible for properly maintaining the smoke detectors in their room. Removal of batteries from smoke detectors is prohibited.

FIRE SAFETY TRAINING:

WSU Fire and Safety conducts fire extinguisher training classes with hands-on extinguishment of fires for university employees. These classes are conducted outside in non-freezing weather using water and propane gas based fire extinguisher training apparatus.

The Fire and Safety Compliance Officer also conducts fire safety seminars and classes for residence halls and academic departments when requested. Five fire safety videos from the Center for Campus Fire Safety regarding college residence hall fires are available. For further information, call the Fire and Safety Compliance Officer’s office at 509-335-4310.

EMERGENCY FIRE RESPONSE:

Pullman Fire Department is a combination department comprised of full-time professional and reserve firefighters engaging in the performance of fire suppression and emergency medical services. Fire suppression is provided to all properties within the city limits of Pullman including Washington State University. Department Paramedics and Emergency Medical Technicians provide ambulance service to the city and to 450 square miles of rural area including the towns of Johnson, Albion, and Palouse.

LIFE SAFETY TECHNICIANS:

WSU Facilities Operations employs full-time NICET certified life safety technicians who routinely maintain and test fire sprinkler systems, fire alarm systems, and fire extinguishers on the Pullman campus to ensure reliable operation in the event of a fire emergency.

PLANS FOR FUTURE IMPROVEMENT IN FIRE SAFETY:

WSU will continue to maintain facilities, including residence halls and university owned apartments in a manner consistent with the International Fire Code, International Building Code, National Fire Protection Association, as well as state and federal laws. All new construction shall be compliant with the appropriate fire, building, and life safety code requirements.

The WSU Fire and Safety Compliance Officer and WSU Life Safety Technicians work closely with the Pullman Fire Marshal and FM Global to address and correct deficiencies in an ongoing effort to improve fire safety on campus.


Section 21 | Annual Disclosure of Crime Statistics

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In accordance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security and Crime Statistics Act, the statistics contained in this report are limited to specific crimes occurring within a designated geographic area for the previous three calendar years (2016, 2017, and 2018) concerning reported crimes that occurred on campus and in certain off-campus buildings or property owned or controlled by WSU.

A map of the designated geographic area, buildings, and property can be viewed in Section 24 of this report. The map provides the geographic area typically included for the purpose of the report, current as of October 1, 2019. In some circumstances, crimes occurring in an area not identified on this map may be included for purposes of inclusion in the annual disclosure of crime statistics. Additionally, the statistics this report may vary from statistics maintained within other WSU offices authorized to receive reports of incidents implicating University policies, such as the Office of Civil Rights Compliance and Investigation, the Center for Community Standards and Cougar Health Services.

Criminal offenses included in this report include the following, as defined by the Revised Code of Washington, the Clery Act, and the Violence Against Women Act:

  • Criminal homicide (includes murder, non-negligent manslaughter, and negligent manslaughter)
  • Rape, Fondling, Incest and Statutory Rape
  • Domestic Violence and Dating Violence Stalking
  • Robbery
  • Aggravated assault
  • Burglary
  • Motor vehicle theft
  • Arson
  • Arrests and referrals for disciplinary action for liquor violations, drug violations, and weapons violation

Hate crimes, including the following listed below, if such crime manifests evidence that the victim was intentionally selected because of the victim’s actual or perceived race, gender, religion, sexual orientation gender identity, ethnicity, or disability:

  • Any crime listed above, as defined by the Clery Act,
  • Crimes of larceny/theft, simple assault, intimidation, and destruction/damage/vandalism of property, or
  • Any other crime involving bodily injury

Individuals can report incidents of discriminatory harassment to:

  • WSU Police Department – 509-335-8548
  • Office of Civil Rights Compliance and Investigation– 509-335-8288;

  • Section 22 | Definitions Under Washington State Law (RCW 9A.44.010, RCW 26.50.010)

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    DEFINITIONS UNDER STATE LAW

    CONSENT

    At the time of the act of sexual intercourse or sexual contact there are actual words or conduct indicating freely given agreement to have sexual intercourse or sexual contact.

    MENTAL INCAPACITY

    A condition existing at the time of the offense which prevents a person from understanding the nature or consequences of the act of sexual intercourse whether that condition is produced by illness, defect, the influence of a substance, or from some other cause.

    PHYSICALLY HELPLESS

    A person who is unconscious or for any other reason is physically unable to communicate unwillingness an act.

    FORCIBLE COMPULSION

    Physical force which overcomes resistance, or a threat, express or implied, that places a person in fear of death or physical injury to herself or himself or another person, or in fear that she or he or another person will be kidnapped.

    SEXUAL INTERCOURSE

    • Has its ordinary meaning and occurs upon any penetration, however slight, and
    • Also means any penetration of the vagina or anus however slight, by an object, when committed on one person by another, whether such persons are of the same or opposite sex, except when such penetration is accomplished for medically recognized treatment or diagnostic purposes, and
    • Also means any act of sexual contact between persons involving the sex organs of one person and the mouth or anus of another whether such persons are of the same or opposite sex

    SEXUAL CONTACT

    Any touching of the sexual or other intimate parts of a person done for the purpose of gratifying sexual desire of either party or a third party.

    DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

    • Physical harm, bodily injury, assault, or the infliction of fear of imminent physical harm, bodily injury or assault, between family or household members;
    • Sexual assault of one family or household member by another; or
    • Stalking as defined in RCW 9A.46.110 of one family or household member by another family or household member.

    FAMILY OR HOUSEHOLD MEMBERS

    Spouses, domestic partners, former spouses, former domestic partners, persons who have a child in common regardless of whether they have been married or have lived together at any time, adult per- so related by blood or marriage, adult persons who are presently residing together or who have resided together in the past, persons sixteen (16) years of age or older who are presently residing together or who have resided together in the past and who have or have had a dating relationship, persons sixteen (16) years of age or older with whom a person sixteen (16) years of age or older has or has had a dating relationship, and persons who have a biological or legal parent-child relationship, including stepparents and stepchildren and grandparents and grandchildren.

    DATING RELATIONSHIP

    A social relationship of a romantic nature. Factors that the court may consider in making this determination include:

    • The length of time the relationship has existed;
    • The nature of the relationship; and
    • The frequency of interaction between the parties


    Section 23 | Covered Crimes Under Washington State Law

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    RAPE IN THE FIRST DEGREE (RCW 9A.44.040)

    A person is guilty of rape in the first degree when such person engages in sexual intercourse with another person by forcible compulsion where the perpetrator or an accessory:

    • Uses or threatens to use a deadly weapon or what appears to be a deadly weapon; or
    • Kidnaps the victim; or
    • Inflicts serious physical injury, including but not limited to physical injury which renders the victim unconscious; or
    • Feloniously enters into the building or vehicle where the victim is situated.

    RAPE IN THE SECOND DEGREE (RCW 9A.44.050)

    A person is guilty of rape in the second degree when, under circumstances not constituting rape in the first degree, the person engages in sexual intercourse with another person:

    • By forcible compulsion;
    • When the victim is incapable of consent by reason of being physically helpless or mentally incapacitated;
    • When the victim is a person with a developmental disability and the perpetrator is a person who is not married to the victim and who:
      • Has supervisory authority over the victim; or
      • Was providing transportation, within the course of his or her employment, to the victim at the time of the offense;
    • When the perpetrator is a health care provider, the victim is a client or patient, and the sexual intercourse occurs during a treatment session, consultation, interview, or examination. It is an affirmative defense that the defendant must prove by a preponderance of the evidence that the client or patient consented to the sexual intercourse with the knowledge that the sexual intercourse was not for the purpose of treatment;
    • When the victim is a resident of a facility for persons with a mental disorder or chemical dependency and the perpetrator is a person who is not married to the victim and has supervisory authority over the victim; or
    • When the victim is a frail elder or vulnerable adult and the perpetrator is a person who is not married to the victim and who:
      • Has a significant relationship with the victim; or
      • Was providing transportation, within the course of his or her employment, to the victim at the time of the offense.

    RAPE IN THE THIRD DEGREE (RCW 9A.44.060)

    A person is guilty of rape in the third degree when, under circumstances not constituting rape in the first or second degrees, such person engages in sexual intercourse with another person:

    • (a) Where the victim did not consent as defined in RCW 9A.44.010(7), to sexual intercourse with the perpetrator and such lack of consent was clearly expressed by the victim’s words or conduct, or
    • (b) Where there is threat of substantial unlawful harm to property rights of the victim.

    VOYEURISM (RCW 9A.44.115)

    A person commits the crime of voyeurism if, for the purpose of arousing or gratifying the sexual desire any person, he or she knowingly views, photographs, or films:

    • Another person without that person’s knowledge and consent while the person being viewed, photographed, or filmed is in a place where he or she would have a reasonable expectation of privacy; or
    • The intimate areas of another person without that person’s knowledge and consent and under circumstances where the person has a reasonable expectation of privacy, whether in a public or private place.

    INDECENT EXPOSURE (RCW 9A.88.010)

    A person is guilty of indecent exposure if he or she intentionally makes any open and obscene exposure of his or her person or the person of another knowing that such conduct is likely to cause reasonable affront or alarm. The act of breastfeeding or expressing breast milk is not indecent exposure.

    HARASSMENT (RCW 9A.46.020)

    A person is guilty of harassment if:

    • Without lawful authority, the person knowingly threatens:
      • To cause bodily injury immediately or in the future to the person threatened or to any other person; or
      • To cause physical damage to the property of a person other than the actor or subject the person threatened or any other person to physical confinement or restraint; or
      • Maliciously to do any other act which is intended to substantially harm the person threatened or another with respect to his or her physical or mental health or safety; and
    • The person by words or conduct places the person threatened in reasonable fear that the threat will be carried out. “Words or conduct” includes, in addition to any other form of communication or conduct, the sending of an electronic communication.

    STALKING (RCW 9A.46.110)

    A person commits the crime of stalking if, without lawful authority and under circumstances not amounting to a felony attempt of another crime:

    • He or she intentionally and repeatedly harasses or repeatedly follows another person, and the person being harassed or followed is placed in fear that the stalker intends to injure the person, another person, or property of the person or of another.
      • The feeling of fear must be one that a reasonable person in the same situation would experience under all the circumstances; and
    • The stalker either:
      • Intends to frighten, intimidate, or harass the person; or
      • Knows or reasonably should know that the person is afraid, intimidated, or harassed even if the stalker did not intend to place the person in fear or intimidate or harass the person.


    Section 24 | Reporting Coverage Map

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    CRIME STATISTICS GEOGRAPHIC AREA

    The locations for which Clery crimes are reported in the tables below includes the following areas:

    1. Buildings and property that are part of the institution’s campus;
    2. The institution’s non-campus buildings and property; and
    3. Public property within or immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus.

    Campus is defined as:

    1. Any building or property owned or controlled by an institution within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area and used by the institution in direct support of, or in a manner related to, the institution’s educational purposes, including residence halls; and
    2. Any building or property that is within or reasonably contiguous to the area identified in paragraph (i) of this definition, that is owned by the institution but controlled by another person, is frequently used by students, and supports institutional purposes (such as a food or other retail vendor).

    Clery crimes are also reported when they occur at non-campus student housing facilities which includes university recognized fraternity and sorority residences.


    Section 25 | Fire Statistics

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    2016–2018* Fire Statistics, Residence Halls, WSU Pullman
    Residence Halls # Of Fires Fire Causes # Of Fire Deaths # Of Fire Injuries
    Coman – 2016 0 n/a 0 0
    Coman – 2017 0 n/a 0 0
    Coman – 2018 0 n/a 0 0
    Community Duncan-Dunn – 2016 0 n/a 0 0
    Community Duncan-Dunn – 2017 0 n/a 0 0
    Community Duncan-Dunn – 2018 0 n/a 0 0
    Gannon – 2016 0 n/a 0 0
    Gannon – 2017 0 n/a 0 0
    Gannon – 2018 0 n/a 0 0
    Global Scholars – 2016 1 Intentional: Food Container 0 0
    Global Scholars – 2017 0 n/a 0 0
    Global Scholars – 2018 0 n/a 0 0
    Goldsworthy – 2016 0 n/a 0 0
    Goldsworthy – 2017 0 n/a 0 0
    Goldsworthy – 2018 0 n/a 0 0
    Honors – 2016 0 n/a 0 0
    Honors – 2017 0 n/a 0 0
    Honors – 2018 0 n/a 0 0
    McCroskey – 2016 0 n/a 0 0
    McCroskey – 2017 0 n/a 0 0
    McCroskey – 2018 0 n/a 0 0
    McEachern – 2016 0 n/a 0 0
    McEachern – 2017 0 n/a 0 0
    McEachern – 2018 0 n/a 0 0
    Northside – 2016 0 n/a 0 0
    Northside – 2017 0 n/a 0 0
    Northside – 2018 0 n/a 0 0
    Olympia – 2016 1 Cooking 0 0
    Olympia – 2017 0 n/a 0 0
    Olympia – 2018 0 n/a 0 0
    Orton – 2016 0 n/a 0 0
    Orton – 2017 2 Electrical 0 0
    Orton – 2018 0 n/a 0 0
    Perham – 2016 0 n/a 0 0
    Perham – 2017 0 n/a 0 0
    Perham – 2018 0 n/a 0 0
    Regents – 2016 0 n/a 0 0
    Regents – 2017 0 n/a 0 0
    Regents – 2018 0 n/a 0 0
    Rogers – 2016 2 Intentional: Paper on Door 0 0
    Rogers – 2017 0 n/a 0 0
    Rogers – 2018 0 n/a 0 0
    Scott – 2016 0 n/a 0 0
    Scott – 2017 0 n/a 0 0
    Scott – 2018 0 n/a 0 0
    Stephenson East – 2016 0 n/a 0 0
    Stephenson East – 2017 0 n/a 0 0
    Stephenson East – 2018 0 n/a 0 0
    Stephenson North – 2016 0 n/a 0 0
    Stephenson North – 2017 0 n/a 0 0
    Stephenson North – 2018 0 n/a 0 0
    Stephenson South – 2016 0 n/a 0 0
    Stephenson South – 2017 1 Electrical 0 0
    Stephenson South – 2018 0 n/a 0 0
    Stevens – 2016 0 n/a 0 0
    Stevens – 2017 0 n/a 0 0
    Stevens – 2018 0 n/a 0 0
    Stimson – 2016 0 n/a 0 0
    Stimson – 2017 0 n/a 0 0
    Stimson – 2018 0 n/a 0 0
    Streit – 2016 1 Cooking 0 0
    Streit – 2017 0 n/a 0 0
    Streit – 2018 1 Undertermined 0 0
    Waller – 2016 xx xx xx xx
    Waller – 2017 xx xx xx xx
    Waller – 2018 0 n/a 0 0
    Wilmer-Davis – 2016 0 n/a 0 0
    Wilmer-Davis – 2017 0 n/a 0 0
    Wilmer-Davis – 2018 0 n/a 0 0

    *Statistics are for the 2016, 2017, and 2018 calendar years.
    xx Waller Hall was closed May 2015 through August 2018.


    2016–2018* Fire Statistics, Campus Apartments, WSU Pullman
    Campus Apartments # Of Fires Fire Causes # Of Fire Deaths # Of Fire Injuries
    Chief Joseph – 2016 1 Cooking 0 0
    Chief Joseph – 2017 0 n/a 0 0
    Chief Joseph – 2018 0 n/a 0 0
    Chinook – 2016 1 Cooking 0 0
    Chinook – 2017 0 n/a 0 0
    Chinook – 2018 0 n/a 0 0
    Columbia – 2016 0 n/a 0 0
    Columbia – 2017 0 n/a 0 0
    Columbia – 2018 0 n/a 0 0
    Kamiak – 2016 0 n/a 0 0
    Kamiak – 2017 0 n/a 0 0
    Kamiak – 2018 1 Cooking 0 0
    Nez Perce – 2016 0 n/a 0 0
    Nez Perce – 2017 0 n/a 0 0
    Nez Perce – 2018 0 n/a 0 0
    Steptoe – 2016 1 Cooking 0 0
    Steptoe – 2017 1 Cooking 0 0
    Steptoe – 2018 1 Cooking 0 0
    Terrace – 2016 0 n/a 0 0
    Terrace – 2017 0 n/a 0 0
    Terrace – 2018 0 n/a 0 0
    Valley Crest – 2016 0 n/a 0 0
    Valley Crest – 2017 0 n/a 0 0
    Valley Crest – 2018 0 n/a 0 0
    Yakama – 2016 0 n/a 0 0
    Yakama – 2017 0 n/a 0 0
    Yakama – 2018 0 n/a 0 0

    *Statistics are for the 2016, 2017, and 2018 calendar years.

     


    2016–2018* Fire Statistics, Residence Halls, WSU Pullman
    Residence Halls Property Damage Fire Detection & Suppression # of Fire Drills
    Coman – 2016 0 A, B 3
    Coman – 2017 0 A, B 2
    Coman – 2018 0 A, B 5
    Community Duncan-Dunn – 2016 0 A, B 2
    Community Duncan-Dunn – 2017 0 A, B 2
    Community Duncan-Dunn – 2018 0 A, B 5
    Gannon – 2016 0 A, B 2
    Gannon – 2017 0 A, B 2
    Gannon – 2018 0 A, B 6
    Global Scholars – 2016 0 A, B 2
    Global Scholars – 2017 0 A, B 2
    Global Scholars – 2018 0 A, B 5
    Goldsworthy – 2016 0 A, B 3
    Goldsworthy – 2017 0 A, B 2
    Goldsworthy – 2018 0 A, B 5
    Honors – 2016 0 A, B 2
    Honors – 2017 0 A, B 3
    Honors – 2018 0 A, B 5
    McCroskey – 2016 0 A, B 2
    McCroskey – 2017 0 A, B 3
    McCroskey – 2018 0 A, B 5
    McEachern – 2016 0 A, B 2
    McEachern – 2017 0 A, B 2
    McEachern – 2018 0 A, B 5
    Northside – 2016 0 A, B 2
    Northside – 2017 0 A, B 2
    Northside – 2018 0 A, B 5
    Olympia – 2016 0 A, B 2
    Olympia – 2017 0 A, B 3
    Olympia – 2018 0 A, B 4
    Orton – 2016 0 A, B 2
    Orton – 2017 $4000 A, B 2
    Orton – 2018 0 A, B 5
    Perham – 2016 0 A, B 3
    Perham – 2017 0 A, B 2
    Perham – 2018 0 A, B 5
    Regents – 2016 0 A, B 3
    Regents – 2017 0 A, B 2
    Regents – 2018 0 A, B 5
    Rogers – 2016 $3,001 A, B 2
    Rogers – 2017 0 A, B 3
    Rogers – 2018 0 A, B 5
    Scott – 2016 0 A, B 3
    Scott – 2017 0 A, B 2
    Scott – 2018 0 A, B 5
    Stephenson East – 2016 0 A, B 3
    Stephenson East – 2017 0 A, B 2
    Stephenson East – 2018 0 A, B 5
    Stephenson North – 2016 0 A, B 3
    Stephenson North – 2017 0 A, B 2
    Stephenson North – 2018 0 A, B 5
    Stephenson South – 2016 0 A, B 3
    Stephenson South – 2017 $52 A, B 3
    Stephenson South – 2015 0 A, B 4
    Stevens – 2016 0 A, B 2
    Stevens – 2017 0 A, B 2
    Stevens – 2018 0 A, B 5
    Stimson – 2016 0 A, B 2
    Stimson – 2017 0 A, B 4
    Stimson – 2018 0 A, B 4
    Streit – 2016 0 A, B 3
    Streit – 2017 0 A, B 2
    Streit – 2018 $415 A, B 5
    Waller – 2016 xx xx xx
    Waller – 2017 xx xx xx
    Waller – 2018 0 A, B 2
    Wilmer-Davis – 2016 0 A, B 3
    Wilmer-Davis – 2017 0 A, B 2
    Wilmer-Davis – 2018 0 A, B 5

    *Statistics are for the 2016, 2017, and 2018 calendar years.
    xx Waller Hall was closed May 2015 through August 2018.
    A.) Full Automatic Fire Sprinkler System.
    B.) Automatic Fire Alarm System, with smoke and heat detectors, that reports to a continuously staffed dispatch center.
    C.) Single Station Smoke Detectors in Units


    2016–2018* Fire Statistics, Campus Apartments, WSU Pullman
    Campus Apartments Property Damage Fire Detection & Suppression # Of Fire Drills
    Chief Joseph – 2016 $100 A, B, C 0
    Chief Joseph – 2017 0 A, B, C 0
    Chief Joseph – 2018 0 A, B, C 0
    Chinook – 2016 0 C 0
    Chinook – 2017 0 C 0
    Chinook – 2018 0 C 0
    Columbia – 2016 0 C 0
    Columbia – 2017 0 C 0
    Columbia – 2018 0 C 0
    Kamiak – 2016 0 C 0
    Kamiak – 2017 0 C 0
    Kamiak – 2018 $250 C 0
    Nez Perce – 2016 0 C 0
    Nez Perce – 2017 0 C 0
    Nez Perce – 2018 0 C 0
    Steptoe – 2016 $500 C 0
    Steptoe – 2017 $546 C 0
    Steptoe – 2018 $5000 C 0
    Terrace – 2016 0 C 0
    Terrace – 2017 0 C 0
    Terrace – 2018 0 C 0
    Valley Crest – 2016 0 C 0
    Valley Crest – 2017 0 C 0
    Valley Crest – 2018 0 C 0
    Yakama – 2016 0 A, B 0
    Yakama – 2017 0 A, B 0
    Yakama – 2018 0 A, B 0

    *Statistics are for the 2016, 2017, and 2018 calendar years.
    A.) Full Automatic Fire Sprinkler System.
    B.) Automatic Fire Alarm System, with smoke and heat detectors, that reports to a continuously staffed dispatch center.
    C.) Single Station Smoke Detectors in Units

     


    Section 26 | Comparative Crime Statistics

    Return to Table of Contents


    2016–2018* Comparative Crime Statistics, WSU Pullman, On-Campus Property
    OFFENSE 2016 2017 2018
    Murder/Non-negligent manslaughter 0 0 0
    Manslaughter by Negligence 0 0 0
    Rape 8 10 25
    Fondling 7 5 7
    Incest 0 0 0
    Statutory Rape 0 0 0
    Robbery 2 0 1
    Assault (Aggravated) 4 1 2
    Burglary 32 23 10
    Motor Vehicle Theft 2 5 1
    Arson 2 0 0
    Stalking 14 15 13
    Domestic Violence 3 7 7
    Dating Violence 4 3 14
    Arrests: Alcohol Law Violations 82 75 63
    Arrests: Drug Abuse Violations 49 37 26
    Arrests: Weapons Violations 0 0 1
    Referrals: Alcohol Law Violations 390 234 252
    Referrals: Drug Abuse Violations 246 333 322
    Referrals: Weapons Violations 1 0 0

     


    2016–2018* Comparative Crime Statistics, WSU Pullman, On-Campus Residences (subset of On-Campus Property)
    OFFENSE 2016 2017 2018
    Murder/Non-negligent manslaughter 0 0 0
    Manslaughter by Negligence 0 0 0
    Rape 8 10 25
    Fondling 6 2 5
    Incest 0 0 0
    Statutory Rape 0 0 0
    Robbery 1 0 0
    Assault (Aggravated) 0 0 0
    Burglary 25 15 5
    Motor Vehicle Theft 0 0 0
    Arson 2 0 0
    Stalking 6 7 2
    Domestic Violence 3 6 3
    Dating Violence 4 1 14
    Arrests: Alcohol Law Violations 0 1 0
    Arrests: Drug Abuse Violations 9 10 5
    Arrests: Weapons Violations 0 0 0
    Referrals: Alcohol Law Violations 345 164 169
    Referrals: Drug Abuse Violations 180 259 246
    Referrals: Weapons Violations 0 0 0

     


    2016–2018* Comparative Crime Statistics, WSU Pullman, Non-Campus Student Housing Facilities
    OFFENSE 2016 2017 2018
    Murder/Non-negligent manslaughter 0 0 0
    Manslaughter by Negligence 0 0 0
    Rape 21 7 10
    Fondling 3 1 1
    Incest 0 0 0
    Statutory Rape 0 0 0
    Robbery 0 0 0
    Assault (Aggravated) 3 0 6
    Burglary 11 4 7
    Motor Vehicle Theft 4 0 0
    Arson 0 0 2
    Stalking 1 4 1
    Domestic Violence 0 0 1
    Dating Violence 0 0 0
    Arrests: Alcohol Law Violations 0 4 0
    Arrests: Drug Abuse Violations 0 0 0
    Arrests: Weapons Violations 0 0 0
    Referrals: Alcohol Law Violations 0 2 0
    Referrals: Drug Abuse Violations 0 0 0
    Referrals: Weapons Violations 0 0 0

     


    2016–2018* Comparative Crime Statistics, WSU Pullman, Non-Campus Public Property Pullman
    OFFENSE 2016 2017 2018
    Murder/Non-negligent manslaughter 0 0 0
    Manslaughter by Negligence 0 0 0
    Rape 5 0 0
    Fondling 0 0 0
    Incest 0 0 0
    Statutory Rape 0 0 0
    Robbery 0 0 0
    Assault (Aggravated) 0 0 0
    Burglary 0 0 0
    Motor Vehicle Theft 0 0 0
    Arson 0 0 0
    Stalking 0 0 0
    Domestic Violence 0 0 0
    Dating Violence 0 0 0
    Arrests: Alcohol Law Violations 0 1 2
    Arrests: Drug Abuse Violations 0 0 3
    Arrests: Weapons Violations 0 0 1
    Referrals: Alcohol Law Violations 0 0 0
    Referrals: Drug Abuse Violations 0 0 9
    Referrals: Weapons Violations 0 0 0

     


    2016–2018* Comparative Crime Statistics, WSU Pullman, Unfounded
    OFFENSE 2016 2017 2018
    Murder/Non-negligent manslaughter 0 0 0
    Manslaughter by Negligence 0 0 0
    Rape 0 3 3
    Fondling 0 0 0
    Incest 0 0 0
    Statutory Rape 0 0 0
    Robbery 1 0 0
    Assault (Aggravated) 0 0 0
    Burglary 0 3 0
    Motor Vehicle Theft 8 4 3
    Arson 0 0 0
    Stalking 0 0 0
    Domestic Violence 0 1 0
    Dating Violence 0 0 0

     


    2016–2018* Comparative Crime Statistics, WSU Extension Sites, Academic Centers
    OFFENSE 2016 2017 2018
    Murder/Non-negligent manslaughter 0 0 0
    Manslaughter by Negligence 0 0 0
    Rape 0 0 0
    Fondling 0 0 0
    Incest 0 0 0
    Statutory Rape 0 0 0
    Robbery 0 0 0
    Assault (Aggravated) 0 0 0
    Burglary 0 0 1
    Motor Vehicle Theft 0 0 0
    Arson 0 0 0
    Stalking 0 0 0
    Domestic Violence 0 0 0
    Dating Violence 0 0 0
    Arrests: Alcohol Law Violations 0 0 0
    Arrests: Drug Abuse Violations 0 0 0
    Arrests: Weapons Violations 0 0 0
    Referrals: Alcohol Law Violations 0 0 0
    Referrals: Drug Abuse Violations 0 0 0
    Referrals: Weapons Violations 0 0 0

     


    2016–2018* Comparative Crime Statistics, WSU Extension Sites, County Learning Centers
    OFFENSE 2016 2017 2018
    Murder/Non-negligent manslaughter 0 0 0
    Manslaughter by Negligence 0 0 0
    Rape 0 0 0
    Fondling 0 0 0
    Incest 0 0 0
    Statutory Rape 0 0 0
    Robbery 0 0 0
    Assault (Aggravated) 0 0 0
    Burglary 0 0 0
    Motor Vehicle Theft 0 0 0
    Arson 0 0 0
    Stalking 0 0 0
    Domestic Violence 0 0 0
    Dating Violence 0 0 0
    Arrests: Alcohol Law Violations 0 0 0
    Arrests: Drug Abuse Violations 0 0 0
    Arrests: Weapons Violations 0 0 0
    Referrals: Alcohol Law Violations 0 0 0
    Referrals: Drug Abuse Violations 0 0 0
    Referrals: Weapons Violations 0 0 0

     


    2016–2018* Comparative Crime Statistics, WSU Extension Sites, Agriculture Research Centers
    OFFENSE 2016 2017 2018
    Murder/Non-negligent manslaughter 0 0 0
    Manslaughter by Negligence 0 0 0
    Rape 0 0 0
    Fondling 0 0 0
    Incest 0 0 0
    Statutory Rape 0 0 0
    Robbery 0 0 0
    Assault (Aggravated) 0 0 0
    Burglary 0 0 0
    Motor Vehicle Theft 0 1 0
    Arson 0 0 0
    Stalking 0 0 0
    Domestic Violence 0 0 0
    Dating Violence 0 0 0
    Arrests: Alcohol Law Violations 0 0 0
    Arrests: Drug Abuse Violations 0 0 0
    Arrests: Weapons Violations 0 0 0
    Referrals: Alcohol Law Violations 0 0 0
    Referrals: Drug Abuse Violations 0 0 0
    Referrals: Weapons Violations 0 0 0

     

    For 2016, there were no reported Hate Crimes.

    For 2017, there was one on-campus intimidation incident characterized by race bias and one on-campus intimidation incident characterized by sexual orientation bias.

    For 2018, there was one on-campus intimidation incident characterized by religion, and there was one on-campus intimidation and vandalism incident characterized by sexual orientation.

    A description of Hate Crimes for purposes of this report can be found in Section 21.

    It should be noted that this report provides the definition of Domestic Violence as defined by Washington State law (RCW). However, for the purpose of reporting statistics, some relationships, falling under the Washington State definition of domestic violence, may be counted as dating violence, not domestic violence, pursuant to the definitions provided by the Clery Act. The Clery Act definition generally provides that an intimate, or romantic, relationship must exist to be considered dating violence, whereas, domestic violence requires that the individuals be cohabitating as current or former spouses, or have an intimate relationship, thus, the relationship must be more than just two people living together as roommates. The complete definition can be found in The Handbook for Campus Safety and Security Reporting. (see Chapter 3, U.S. Department of Education, Office of Postsecondary Education, The Handbook for Campus Safety and Security Reporting, 2016 Edition,Washington, D.C., 2016.) The report is available on the Department of Education’s website at http://www.ed.gov/admins/lead/safety/campus.html.